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No worries at all! 🙂 thank you for clarifying, I want to make sure I give you the right answer.  So in that blog post, it does actually go over the water dispenser option you are talking about. In a very small sections, they are reffered to as office jugs.  Here is a quote from the article: “Office jugs (the big upside down ones) have similar problems. They are mostly transparent, hard to handle, and not designed for long term storage or emergencies. What if you don’t have the base part? How do you reseal the jug?” I do have to agree with the article and here is my personal reason why: They are transparent, which can lead to bacteria growth if sun hits it. Which can maybe be avoided if stored in a closet and rotated through regularly.  All the recommended jugs and cans in the article have handles, which would make it so much easier to move around, and many can be stacked or at least say together closely to save space.  The recommended jugs have spigots you can attach to the opening which makes it so you don’t need to have the water dispenser base And the office jugs usually just have a snap on lid which can come off easily. The recommended jugs from the article all have tight fitting screw on lids.  Here are some reasons why I think the office jugs might be a good solution for you: If you have access extra ones for free from work or something, that is a very cheap storage solution.  If you already enjoy and use them and it works for you guys, then keep doing it.  If you use them on a regular basis and rotate through them so bacteria doesn’t grow, then the opacity isn’t as big of a factor.  Office jugs might be just fine for bugging in, but if you need to leave for any reason, I think all the others are much better.  I think the article is written mostly for people who would just fill up the containers and store them long term. They need non-transparent containers and have durability in mind. Those office jugs are pretty tough though, besides the weak point of not having a screw on lid,  they can be tossed around quite a bit.  Hope that helps.  I’m curious, why do you like the office jugs? Is there a benefit about them we missed?

Hi Dave! I am in a manual wheelchair and prepping for me is VERY different than it used to be before my motorcycle accident. I have so many more things to think about such as fixing a flat wheelchair tire, making sure it is always in good working order, lubing up the casters, and more! I’m in the same boat that if something really bad ever happened, I am more likely to bug-in than bug-out because I am well established at my home and mobility is a huge issue for me. There have already been multiple good comments in this post for home defense such as a fireplace poker or wasp spray, but also think about being proactive beforehand. Make sure that you have good locks on windows and doors and use them regularly, keep valuables out of sight, have security lighting around your house, etc… Make it as hard and miserable as you can for the bad guy to get to you. Getting a tough looking dog might be a good idea too. It can be your service dog when you are out and about so it can go with you wherever you go, and be a deterrent from people messing with you. Plus they are good friends to have too. Another thing that I have done is contact my local police/emergency response group with the city. I said “Hey, I have this disability and this is what I require. If there was ever an emergency and you are doing evacuations, I want you to know this about me.” They said that they can maybe help me out before other more abled people.  Let me know if you have any specific questions! I’d love to help out more if I can 🙂


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No worries at all! 🙂 thank you for clarifying, I want to make sure I give you the right answer.  So in that blog post, it does actually go over the water dispenser option you are talking about. In a very small sections, they are reffered to as office jugs.  Here is a quote from the article: “Office jugs (the big upside down ones) have similar problems. They are mostly transparent, hard to handle, and not designed for long term storage or emergencies. What if you don’t have the base part? How do you reseal the jug?” I do have to agree with the article and here is my personal reason why: They are transparent, which can lead to bacteria growth if sun hits it. Which can maybe be avoided if stored in a closet and rotated through regularly.  All the recommended jugs and cans in the article have handles, which would make it so much easier to move around, and many can be stacked or at least say together closely to save space.  The recommended jugs have spigots you can attach to the opening which makes it so you don’t need to have the water dispenser base And the office jugs usually just have a snap on lid which can come off easily. The recommended jugs from the article all have tight fitting screw on lids.  Here are some reasons why I think the office jugs might be a good solution for you: If you have access extra ones for free from work or something, that is a very cheap storage solution.  If you already enjoy and use them and it works for you guys, then keep doing it.  If you use them on a regular basis and rotate through them so bacteria doesn’t grow, then the opacity isn’t as big of a factor.  Office jugs might be just fine for bugging in, but if you need to leave for any reason, I think all the others are much better.  I think the article is written mostly for people who would just fill up the containers and store them long term. They need non-transparent containers and have durability in mind. Those office jugs are pretty tough though, besides the weak point of not having a screw on lid,  they can be tossed around quite a bit.  Hope that helps.  I’m curious, why do you like the office jugs? Is there a benefit about them we missed?

Hi Dave! I am in a manual wheelchair and prepping for me is VERY different than it used to be before my motorcycle accident. I have so many more things to think about such as fixing a flat wheelchair tire, making sure it is always in good working order, lubing up the casters, and more! I’m in the same boat that if something really bad ever happened, I am more likely to bug-in than bug-out because I am well established at my home and mobility is a huge issue for me. There have already been multiple good comments in this post for home defense such as a fireplace poker or wasp spray, but also think about being proactive beforehand. Make sure that you have good locks on windows and doors and use them regularly, keep valuables out of sight, have security lighting around your house, etc… Make it as hard and miserable as you can for the bad guy to get to you. Getting a tough looking dog might be a good idea too. It can be your service dog when you are out and about so it can go with you wherever you go, and be a deterrent from people messing with you. Plus they are good friends to have too. Another thing that I have done is contact my local police/emergency response group with the city. I said “Hey, I have this disability and this is what I require. If there was ever an emergency and you are doing evacuations, I want you to know this about me.” They said that they can maybe help me out before other more abled people.  Let me know if you have any specific questions! I’d love to help out more if I can 🙂


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