Discussions
Dehydrating food at home
11
13

There is a plethora of bad prepping advice circulating around, and in my opinion much of it boils down to too many preppers focusing on, and offering advice for, a zombie-apocalypse style societal collapse while overlooking the far more likely scenarios like natural disasters and such.  Some of the bad advice, or simply overlooked topics in my opinion include: Focusing on guns and ammo at the expense of potentially more important and useful items.  For instance, if you keep a gun by your bed, but not a fire-extinguisher, then you need to re-evaluate how you research and analyse threats. Same if you have a larger stockpile of ammo than you do food and water.  Now I’m not saying guns and ammo are not important, but it’s clear that many use prepping as an excuse to indulge their gun hobby.  The idea to avoid roads in anything other than a war-zone is ludicrous.  Anyone offering that advice has clearly never done much off-trail hiking or trekking.  Walking or riding a bike on an unkept surface is at best exhausting and at worst dangerous.  If your goal is to move your body as fast and as far as possible, then stay on roads and paths unless you honestly fear you may be murdered.   And speaking of bikes, far too many preppers fixate on bug-out-vehicles and fuel storage while completely overlooking bicycles.  While the masses sit in traffic jams or run out of fuel, those with bikes will zip on by.  Corporeal transportation is a neglected topic in the prepping community, in my opinion. Not enough emphasis on physical and mental health, with extra emphasis on mental health because it is clear that the prepping community is rife with folks who struggle with stress and anxiety (obviously all of us do to a degree or we wouldn’t be here!).  While we all know we need to keep a cool head in a time of crisis, we very rarely discuss the challenges of mental health or ways we can care for ourselves and others.

“If you are going by Foot or Bicycle you need to avoid ALL of the primary and secondary roads and where possible go cross country ( route needying reccying again to ensure you dont trespass someplace and get shot) .  it is better to PARALLEL roads rather than walk on them, IE walk parallel to the road about 100 or 200 yards away from it…” I’m sorry but I believe this to be bad advice.  Any thru-hiker or long-distance-runner will tell you that the surface on which you are walking or running plays a significant role in determining how fast and far you can travel.  The differences between concrete, asphalt, dirt, or sod significantly impact speed, distance, and wear and tear on the walker or runner’s body and equipment.  If you throw in unkept/uneven ground with roots, holes, bushes, rocks, and downed trees into the mix, you are now talking about a situation in which you will be moving much more slowly while simultaneously tearing up your equipment and body at a faster rate. For example, in the road-running community, we measure ourselves by the distance we run, knowing the surface is predictably consistent.  In the trail-running community, we measure ourselves by the amount of time we run, understanding that it is the wear-and-tear on one’s body that is the hard limiter.  Hiking and distance-walking are the same- even and smooth surfaces require less mental and physical energy, while uneven and rough surfaces require mental focus and tire you out much more quickly.  Uneven and cluttered surfaces also raise the potential for falls and ankle-sprains, especially if you are carrying a heavy pack. And if you are on a bicycle- on a relatively flat elevation most people of decent athletic prowess could hop on a bike and cover 60+ miles a day- on a paved road.  But 100 yards off that paved road, I suspect most people would be lucky if they could cover 10 miles, assuming they didn’t crash or get a flat tire.  Riding a bike off-road/path is very difficult, and frankly can be dangerous if you don’t know what you are doing.  Unless you have the right equipment and experience, don’t ride your BOB loaded bike off-road if you can help it. Now sure, if you’re in a WAR ZONE or a ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE, or otherwise find yourself in a situation in which other humans are the main threat, by all means, stay off the road.  But if you are fleeing an earthquake, fire, hurricane, or one of the other far-more-likely disaster scenarios you may be fleeing from on foot or bicycle, stay on the roads and paths and get your body to safety as quickly and efficiently as possible.  


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Dehydrating food at home
11
13
Crampons (ice traction for your feet)
6
14
KN95 mask recommendations?
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10
I took a deep dive down the flashlight rabbit hole
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19
What do you carry with you every day? and how?
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The importance of knowing your way around
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Everyday footwear
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Shout-out for arugula!
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Lockdowns, part 2
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There is a plethora of bad prepping advice circulating around, and in my opinion much of it boils down to too many preppers focusing on, and offering advice for, a zombie-apocalypse style societal collapse while overlooking the far more likely scenarios like natural disasters and such.  Some of the bad advice, or simply overlooked topics in my opinion include: Focusing on guns and ammo at the expense of potentially more important and useful items.  For instance, if you keep a gun by your bed, but not a fire-extinguisher, then you need to re-evaluate how you research and analyse threats. Same if you have a larger stockpile of ammo than you do food and water.  Now I’m not saying guns and ammo are not important, but it’s clear that many use prepping as an excuse to indulge their gun hobby.  The idea to avoid roads in anything other than a war-zone is ludicrous.  Anyone offering that advice has clearly never done much off-trail hiking or trekking.  Walking or riding a bike on an unkept surface is at best exhausting and at worst dangerous.  If your goal is to move your body as fast and as far as possible, then stay on roads and paths unless you honestly fear you may be murdered.   And speaking of bikes, far too many preppers fixate on bug-out-vehicles and fuel storage while completely overlooking bicycles.  While the masses sit in traffic jams or run out of fuel, those with bikes will zip on by.  Corporeal transportation is a neglected topic in the prepping community, in my opinion. Not enough emphasis on physical and mental health, with extra emphasis on mental health because it is clear that the prepping community is rife with folks who struggle with stress and anxiety (obviously all of us do to a degree or we wouldn’t be here!).  While we all know we need to keep a cool head in a time of crisis, we very rarely discuss the challenges of mental health or ways we can care for ourselves and others.

“If you are going by Foot or Bicycle you need to avoid ALL of the primary and secondary roads and where possible go cross country ( route needying reccying again to ensure you dont trespass someplace and get shot) .  it is better to PARALLEL roads rather than walk on them, IE walk parallel to the road about 100 or 200 yards away from it…” I’m sorry but I believe this to be bad advice.  Any thru-hiker or long-distance-runner will tell you that the surface on which you are walking or running plays a significant role in determining how fast and far you can travel.  The differences between concrete, asphalt, dirt, or sod significantly impact speed, distance, and wear and tear on the walker or runner’s body and equipment.  If you throw in unkept/uneven ground with roots, holes, bushes, rocks, and downed trees into the mix, you are now talking about a situation in which you will be moving much more slowly while simultaneously tearing up your equipment and body at a faster rate. For example, in the road-running community, we measure ourselves by the distance we run, knowing the surface is predictably consistent.  In the trail-running community, we measure ourselves by the amount of time we run, understanding that it is the wear-and-tear on one’s body that is the hard limiter.  Hiking and distance-walking are the same- even and smooth surfaces require less mental and physical energy, while uneven and rough surfaces require mental focus and tire you out much more quickly.  Uneven and cluttered surfaces also raise the potential for falls and ankle-sprains, especially if you are carrying a heavy pack. And if you are on a bicycle- on a relatively flat elevation most people of decent athletic prowess could hop on a bike and cover 60+ miles a day- on a paved road.  But 100 yards off that paved road, I suspect most people would be lucky if they could cover 10 miles, assuming they didn’t crash or get a flat tire.  Riding a bike off-road/path is very difficult, and frankly can be dangerous if you don’t know what you are doing.  Unless you have the right equipment and experience, don’t ride your BOB loaded bike off-road if you can help it. Now sure, if you’re in a WAR ZONE or a ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE, or otherwise find yourself in a situation in which other humans are the main threat, by all means, stay off the road.  But if you are fleeing an earthquake, fire, hurricane, or one of the other far-more-likely disaster scenarios you may be fleeing from on foot or bicycle, stay on the roads and paths and get your body to safety as quickly and efficiently as possible.  


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