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I’ve read anywhere from 5 times the normal shelf life… to indefinitly.  Amaranth seems to have a normal shelf life of 2 years, so freezing should extend that to 10+ years.  I think the range has more to do with the type of freezer and how dry the seeds are.  The seeds need to be very dry.  One test is to bend the seed.  If dry, it should snap.  Obviously that test wouldn’t work with the tiny, roundish amarath seed.  Commercial seed packs, will probably work much better than seed you save, as they dry their seed properly.  You also want to make sure the seed is airtight so that you don’t deal with condensation.  I have some small mylar pouches that I use for seed.  I’ll add a dessicant and then heat seal the pouch to ensure it is airtight. Another option is just to grow some amaranth each year & save the seed heads.  That way you always have a ready supply of seed.  The plants are so decorative, you could just plant them in a regular flower bed.  The video below, with the giant amaranth, shows you how to dry the seed.  In my case, I just chop off the tops of a few plants & hang them in my upper barn.  After a few weeks, if you rub the dried flowers, the seeds just falls off.  If you are just doing this to get the seed, there is no need to clean the seed of chaff.  Just collect it, put in an airtight container & store in a cool spot. I built a prepper closet in my upper barn, that is very well insulated and has a wall mounted air conditioner.  That room stays dry & no warmer than 65.  I feel that helps my bulk seed and other items last much longer.  It can get hot here in Mississippi.  But small seed like amaranth goes in the freezer.

My understanding is all amaranth, including the wild weed, are edible & healthy.  The commercial varieties are divided into two general classifications… leaf varieties & grain varieties.  The leaf varieties, such as Chinese multicolor spinach in your link, have been bred for their sweet, spinach like leaves.  Many times those plants are shorter.  Grain varieties, such as golden giant, produce huge numbers of seed… like 1 lb per plant. But all varieties produce edible leaves and all produce lots of seed.  As I stated above, since I’ll be growing field corn in a survival situation, I personally am not interested in processing that seed into flour so I concentrate on the leaf varieties.  This year I grew Chinese spinach variety from Eden Brothers, and its leaves are solid green.  Next year I’m gonna try that multicolor spinach.  On other sites it is called red leaf.  On the following link, you can get a pound of seed for $35.  That pound of seed is over a half million seeds.  Take a tiny amount out to grow next year and freeze the balance for an emergency. https://www.kitazawaseed.com/seed_221-145.html A few years back I grew that golden giant variety and they really got big… like 10′ tall.  One issue with really tall plants is they are more susceptible to getting knocked over with high winds in a thunderstorm.  That is not really a huge problem as they will keep growing.  You just might not have pretty, neat, straight rows. I’d probably suggest starting with a leaf variety.  The leaves would probably taste better for most.  Me, I like them all but then again, I love collards & some don’t care for them.  The way I see it, in a survival situation, where folks are starving and haven’t been to KFC for lunch, then I think those hungry folk will not be too picky.  Also in a survival scenario, I expect most major meals will either be a soup or stew, where you get all the nutrition from your food.  So one could easily add a bunch of amaranth leaves into the soup and taste wouldn’t be a concern… just nutrition. When harvesting the leaves, the younger leaves will be the most tender & sweetest.  They can be eaten raw.  The older leaves will need to be cooked.  I’ve seen videos where Jamaicans will take the stalks & peel the outer, tough layer & add the stalks to the calliloo.  Also, when harvesting, you can simply pick off the individual leaves you want.  As opposed to that, I cut the top half or third of the plant off & brought those inside for cleaning.  That is the beauty of amaranth in that that doesn’t hurt the plant any more than cutting your lawn hurts your grass.  It just puts out new, tender growth.

Exactly.  I feel that starving neighbors can be our greatest threat.  If you are eating & they are starving, you really think they are gonna just die quietly?  They have a right to be out & about, so they could take you out at any time. And you are right.  You could give them a self sustaining food that grows quick & like a weed, will quickly regenerate growth when harvested.  Also, they could have food quickly.  Since the seed is so small, usually you would broadcast the seed as opposed to planting it seed by seed.  As the plants start growing within a week or so, one would start thinning out the plot.  At that growth stage the entire plant is edible and can be eaten raw. It is truely self sustaining, in that a tiny little seed can grow a huge plant that is 100% edible at cerain growth stages.  Compare to say corn, which grows to a similar size.  For that big plant, you just get an ear or two of corn.  Even if you don’t eat those two ears and save as seed, that would only give you maybe 500 new plants.  One amaranth plant, with seed saved, could give you at least 200,000 plants. I keep enough other seed in storage so that I can give some of that to neighbors, but amaranth would be the main gift.  I would give them some of my 3 sisters seeds, which should keep them happy.  Since garden seed only stores for a couple of years, each year I add new seed to storage.  Just yesterday I put up 25 lbs of field corn, 5 lbs of pole beans & a pound of winter squash… along with 1/2 lb of collard seed.  Small seed like amaranth can be kept in a freezer, so it can last much longer.  A huge number of that seed takes up just a tiny amount of freezer space.


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I’ve read anywhere from 5 times the normal shelf life… to indefinitly.  Amaranth seems to have a normal shelf life of 2 years, so freezing should extend that to 10+ years.  I think the range has more to do with the type of freezer and how dry the seeds are.  The seeds need to be very dry.  One test is to bend the seed.  If dry, it should snap.  Obviously that test wouldn’t work with the tiny, roundish amarath seed.  Commercial seed packs, will probably work much better than seed you save, as they dry their seed properly.  You also want to make sure the seed is airtight so that you don’t deal with condensation.  I have some small mylar pouches that I use for seed.  I’ll add a dessicant and then heat seal the pouch to ensure it is airtight. Another option is just to grow some amaranth each year & save the seed heads.  That way you always have a ready supply of seed.  The plants are so decorative, you could just plant them in a regular flower bed.  The video below, with the giant amaranth, shows you how to dry the seed.  In my case, I just chop off the tops of a few plants & hang them in my upper barn.  After a few weeks, if you rub the dried flowers, the seeds just falls off.  If you are just doing this to get the seed, there is no need to clean the seed of chaff.  Just collect it, put in an airtight container & store in a cool spot. I built a prepper closet in my upper barn, that is very well insulated and has a wall mounted air conditioner.  That room stays dry & no warmer than 65.  I feel that helps my bulk seed and other items last much longer.  It can get hot here in Mississippi.  But small seed like amaranth goes in the freezer.

My understanding is all amaranth, including the wild weed, are edible & healthy.  The commercial varieties are divided into two general classifications… leaf varieties & grain varieties.  The leaf varieties, such as Chinese multicolor spinach in your link, have been bred for their sweet, spinach like leaves.  Many times those plants are shorter.  Grain varieties, such as golden giant, produce huge numbers of seed… like 1 lb per plant. But all varieties produce edible leaves and all produce lots of seed.  As I stated above, since I’ll be growing field corn in a survival situation, I personally am not interested in processing that seed into flour so I concentrate on the leaf varieties.  This year I grew Chinese spinach variety from Eden Brothers, and its leaves are solid green.  Next year I’m gonna try that multicolor spinach.  On other sites it is called red leaf.  On the following link, you can get a pound of seed for $35.  That pound of seed is over a half million seeds.  Take a tiny amount out to grow next year and freeze the balance for an emergency. https://www.kitazawaseed.com/seed_221-145.html A few years back I grew that golden giant variety and they really got big… like 10′ tall.  One issue with really tall plants is they are more susceptible to getting knocked over with high winds in a thunderstorm.  That is not really a huge problem as they will keep growing.  You just might not have pretty, neat, straight rows. I’d probably suggest starting with a leaf variety.  The leaves would probably taste better for most.  Me, I like them all but then again, I love collards & some don’t care for them.  The way I see it, in a survival situation, where folks are starving and haven’t been to KFC for lunch, then I think those hungry folk will not be too picky.  Also in a survival scenario, I expect most major meals will either be a soup or stew, where you get all the nutrition from your food.  So one could easily add a bunch of amaranth leaves into the soup and taste wouldn’t be a concern… just nutrition. When harvesting the leaves, the younger leaves will be the most tender & sweetest.  They can be eaten raw.  The older leaves will need to be cooked.  I’ve seen videos where Jamaicans will take the stalks & peel the outer, tough layer & add the stalks to the calliloo.  Also, when harvesting, you can simply pick off the individual leaves you want.  As opposed to that, I cut the top half or third of the plant off & brought those inside for cleaning.  That is the beauty of amaranth in that that doesn’t hurt the plant any more than cutting your lawn hurts your grass.  It just puts out new, tender growth.

Exactly.  I feel that starving neighbors can be our greatest threat.  If you are eating & they are starving, you really think they are gonna just die quietly?  They have a right to be out & about, so they could take you out at any time. And you are right.  You could give them a self sustaining food that grows quick & like a weed, will quickly regenerate growth when harvested.  Also, they could have food quickly.  Since the seed is so small, usually you would broadcast the seed as opposed to planting it seed by seed.  As the plants start growing within a week or so, one would start thinning out the plot.  At that growth stage the entire plant is edible and can be eaten raw. It is truely self sustaining, in that a tiny little seed can grow a huge plant that is 100% edible at cerain growth stages.  Compare to say corn, which grows to a similar size.  For that big plant, you just get an ear or two of corn.  Even if you don’t eat those two ears and save as seed, that would only give you maybe 500 new plants.  One amaranth plant, with seed saved, could give you at least 200,000 plants. I keep enough other seed in storage so that I can give some of that to neighbors, but amaranth would be the main gift.  I would give them some of my 3 sisters seeds, which should keep them happy.  Since garden seed only stores for a couple of years, each year I add new seed to storage.  Just yesterday I put up 25 lbs of field corn, 5 lbs of pole beans & a pound of winter squash… along with 1/2 lb of collard seed.  Small seed like amaranth can be kept in a freezer, so it can last much longer.  A huge number of that seed takes up just a tiny amount of freezer space.


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