Kits (2)
Discussions

One thing I’m glad I invested/increased was stored propane.  The 20lb canisters are a seasonal item at Costco for BBQs (best price I found).  My husband found a local place to fill them at a much better price than swapping at the front of a big box store and that the price varied a lot across locations.  The price of all fuels has risen sharply since last summer when we started this.     Given what you’ve learned, I’m glad I got the freeze-dried GF meals for our BOBs a year or more ago. One thing I’ve done during the pandemic was to track our use-rate of items.  I think we have a 20 year supply of plastic wrap because one roll will last that long.  I do watch for Costco sales for shelf stable items like aluminum foil, toilet paper, gauze pads, ZipLoc bags, or bar soap, but also keep to a reasonable amount limited by use rate/duration or storage space.  Storage space is also a cost that we don’t always consider completely.   Another area we’ve seen a sharp increase in pricing is building hardware and other materials.  We updated our deck and the price for a box of deck screws and wood went up a lot from last summer to this and that was after an increase the previous year as well.   The super sized washers I’m using as drape weights for the patio curtains have doubled in price now that they’re actually back in stock after months and months of empty bins.  Having these sorts of items on-hand for repairs and ad-hoc disaster proofing is helpful, but also takes storage space.  And I can also say that the mantra that crossed my mine a lot this past weekend “if you can’t find it, you don’t really own it” as I searched for something in vain. 

You’ve already had some great inputs.  Note that dry items like tablets store longer than liquids or gels.  There’s a full list for the home on the site here.  Things that come to mind to add.   +1 for mucinex – or another brand of expectorant.  It seems to be what helps me the most to prevent a cold from progressing to pneumonia.  I upped my stores just prior to the pandemic since COVID was respiratory. Benedryl for allergic reactions.  Has helped a friend during a life threatening reaction to a medication. Can also help with bee stings and other acute allergic triggers. +1 for Claritin for long term allergies works best for my chemistry.  Zyrtec or Allegra may do better for you.   Suncreen is in this category for me because if I don’t put it on before clothing, it just doesn’t seem to happen.  Lotion for sunburn for when suncreen didn’t happen- it’s not the same as for dry skin.  Pops’ Watergel would work here. Just learned that my Aloe Vera had gone weird when a relative was in need.    Hydrocortisone cream for rashes.   Cough drops Epsom Salts Butterfly bandages and/or Steristrips – that has kept us from the ER for stitches a few times.   +1 for electrolytes as well – when you NEED them you don’t want to go get them.  Get a flavor you like and you’re more likely to actually drink it as well. Tools that are helpful especially during COVID:  thermometer, Sp02 sensor, Blood pressure machine, ECG Gel Ice Packs in the freezer Elastic bandages The makings for chicken broth or whatever hot nourishing liquid you like when you’re down.  I tend to always have this on hand, but should consider freezing it as a kit.


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One thing I’m glad I invested/increased was stored propane.  The 20lb canisters are a seasonal item at Costco for BBQs (best price I found).  My husband found a local place to fill them at a much better price than swapping at the front of a big box store and that the price varied a lot across locations.  The price of all fuels has risen sharply since last summer when we started this.     Given what you’ve learned, I’m glad I got the freeze-dried GF meals for our BOBs a year or more ago. One thing I’ve done during the pandemic was to track our use-rate of items.  I think we have a 20 year supply of plastic wrap because one roll will last that long.  I do watch for Costco sales for shelf stable items like aluminum foil, toilet paper, gauze pads, ZipLoc bags, or bar soap, but also keep to a reasonable amount limited by use rate/duration or storage space.  Storage space is also a cost that we don’t always consider completely.   Another area we’ve seen a sharp increase in pricing is building hardware and other materials.  We updated our deck and the price for a box of deck screws and wood went up a lot from last summer to this and that was after an increase the previous year as well.   The super sized washers I’m using as drape weights for the patio curtains have doubled in price now that they’re actually back in stock after months and months of empty bins.  Having these sorts of items on-hand for repairs and ad-hoc disaster proofing is helpful, but also takes storage space.  And I can also say that the mantra that crossed my mine a lot this past weekend “if you can’t find it, you don’t really own it” as I searched for something in vain. 

You’ve already had some great inputs.  Note that dry items like tablets store longer than liquids or gels.  There’s a full list for the home on the site here.  Things that come to mind to add.   +1 for mucinex – or another brand of expectorant.  It seems to be what helps me the most to prevent a cold from progressing to pneumonia.  I upped my stores just prior to the pandemic since COVID was respiratory. Benedryl for allergic reactions.  Has helped a friend during a life threatening reaction to a medication. Can also help with bee stings and other acute allergic triggers. +1 for Claritin for long term allergies works best for my chemistry.  Zyrtec or Allegra may do better for you.   Suncreen is in this category for me because if I don’t put it on before clothing, it just doesn’t seem to happen.  Lotion for sunburn for when suncreen didn’t happen- it’s not the same as for dry skin.  Pops’ Watergel would work here. Just learned that my Aloe Vera had gone weird when a relative was in need.    Hydrocortisone cream for rashes.   Cough drops Epsom Salts Butterfly bandages and/or Steristrips – that has kept us from the ER for stitches a few times.   +1 for electrolytes as well – when you NEED them you don’t want to go get them.  Get a flavor you like and you’re more likely to actually drink it as well. Tools that are helpful especially during COVID:  thermometer, Sp02 sensor, Blood pressure machine, ECG Gel Ice Packs in the freezer Elastic bandages The makings for chicken broth or whatever hot nourishing liquid you like when you’re down.  I tend to always have this on hand, but should consider freezing it as a kit.


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