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Hi,  Those are some great habits!! I often have oats for breakfast as well with flaxseed, fruit, and peanut butter mixed in. I’m trying to balance prep-friendly food with fresh fruits, veggies, and eggs, but I’ve got a ways to go.  The 2 in 1 out method sounds like a great plan. I haven’t quite gotten the family on board with it yet, but I’m trying. Intermittent fasting sounds like an amazing prep, and I’ve heard great things from friends and family who do it. I’m not to that level–if I ever will be–but I am trying to be mindful about what, when, and how much I eat.  Cooking and mending are two areas I’m trying to improve in as well. I can sew… kind of, but I’m far from where I want to be. There’s a few recipes I can make, but I’m not to the place where I could easily make dinner every night. Mom is adamant that I learn how to feed myself before I head to grad school and has been teaching me, so that skill I’m pretty confident will click with more time.  Oooh, good question. When I have a more permanent adult home (maybe grad school, maybe post grad school), I’d love to garden. Even if it’s just a few vegetables in a window, I love to get my hands dirty, and localizing food production is great for prepping and the environment (those often seem to go hand in hand). I also want to learn basic car maintenance. I’m not going to invest too much time into the ins and outs of a combustion engine because I’m not sure how much longer those will be standard, but knowing how to change a tire or how to jumpstart a battery both seem like important driving skills. 

Great topic!! The pandemic really illustrated how quickly medical stockpiles can run out. I’m by no means a medical professional, but this is what I’ve gathered from my own research and experience.  Bandages have historically been made with torn up fabric, but the reason we use gauze instead is because it’s a) sterile and b) designed to not have bits come off in the wound. While you could probably improvise decent bandages with cleaned cloth in a long term emergency, gauze is always a better choice if you have it on hand. Also, gauze is cheaper than a new shirt.  I’d really recommend you don’t use paper or non-medical tape. Toilet paper is designed to break up in water, and blood is mostly water. I’ve definitely used it to press on a cut that’s bleeding, but even for a small cut, it breaks up after a few minutes. Most tape does not stick to skin well, and stronger tapes run the risk of pulling up skin and leaving a bigger wound than before. (To be fair, my family has fragile skin, but duct tape on any wound sounds bad.)  In a long-term disaster, our best bet is probably going to be traditional medicine. They’re not usually as effective as modern medicine, but medicine was not invented in the last few centuries, and a lot of traditional remedies have legitimate effects. Some modern medicine is even made from artificial or purified traditional medicines. There’s other threads on here- I think even a starred one rn- that have recommendations with books for grid-down medicine.  All that said, there’s a lot of medical supplies you really can’t make well yourself. The human life expectancy used to be much shorter than it is now, and modern medicine has been a huge part of that. We’d be returning to a time where injuries or diseases we hardly notice today could easily cause death or disability. Accepting limitations to prepping is never fun, but with medicine, you have to. 

What are your softcore preps?
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Thank you for the timely post!! The info about back doors and ricochet is also much appreciated!! My siblings and I all had separate gun threats at school this year (one of us had at least four), so I’ve done a lot of reading on this.  The last few years, they’ve been teaching Run Hide Fight in schools. It’s not very different from what you posted, but I’ve found the framework to be helpful for split second decision making.  Even though it feels counterintuitive, you have a better chance of living if you run rather than hide unless you’re running into the line of fire. Know how your building will go into lockdown. My campus has central, open stairways that they close a steel door over (for fire spread control). I doubt those close for a shooter, but I’m not running towards them just to be safe. Jumping out second story* windows is totally reasonable here.  *American second story, European first story Practicing how to barricade a door, especially in places like your office or classroom, can be helpful. Our classrooms have long, heavy tables with locking wheels that you’d need to latch if you wanted to actually barricade. That cabinet next to the door might be too heavy to realistically move, so do check! Also, make sure that the lights are off and that everyone has their phone on silent. If the doors have windows, hide out of view. You want the room to look as empty as possible.  Be very careful about who you open that door for. Shooters have pretended to be police. Hiding in a cabinet is great if that’s an option, but don’t count on being able to dump everything out of a cabinet to get inside it. Remember shooters are more likely to target places they’re familiar with, especially for schools, so don’t rely on established safety codes to be all that safe. The shooter could easily have taken the safety training with you and probably knows the response plan.  Fighting is the absolute last option for obvious reasons, but it’s an option. The plan at my middle/high school was to have someone stand just to the side of the door, against the wall so you can’t see them from the hallway, and whack the shooter with a chair really hard if they broke down the door. That idea sounds horribly useless in retrospect, but we couldn’t handle just huddling in a corner and waiting to die. I know shooters have been successfully tackled before, but the tackler was shot repeatedly in the process.  This probably goes without saying, but first responders are not there to help survivors. The first responders are a SWAT team, and you do not want them to get confused about what role you played.  Also, playing dead isn’t a great strategy because shooters will re-shoot bodies. It might work until the shooter leaves the room the first time (and has saved people’s lives when they were shot in the leg before), but you still need to try leaving ASAP.  When it comes to noticing potential shooters, you want as much information as possible. My sister saw another kid walk down the hallway and pretend to shoot into classrooms and reported it, but they couldn’t identify the student because she didn’t remember the time of the incident to check the security cameras for. Her school had four shooting threats later in graffiti that haven’t come to anything yet but have caused several lockdowns and canceled days. We still don’t know who wrote the graffiti.  Stay safe out there, y’all!

Hi Anthony, Awesome topic!! I have a few tricks that work for me but no comprehensive philosophy of mentally healthy prepping, haha.  Prepping is a healthy expression of anxiety to me. An awareness of how everything can fall apart doesn’t need to be emotionally negative, but it does take awhile to learn how to not be bothered by it. I just can’t lie to myself about things being safer than they really are, so not being aware isn’t an option for me regardless of prepping. I like to think of it as a game or puzzle.  I’m also careful not to let prepping make my life worse now. I’m not going to spend tons of time or money on it at the expense of the present, and I focus my prepping more on areas I enjoy (like first aid) and less on areas that I don’t (like hunting). Integrating prepping into everyday life helps with this too. Instead of the Zombie Survival Bag, it’s having a snack on hand or playing around with the tools that were (wisely) confiscated from me as a child.  Focusing like this is also an excuse to form community with people who have different interests and skills, which is both a great prep and a great mental health boost. And anyway, it’s more effective to really learn a few skills than kinda sorta know a lot of skills if you’ve got a prepping group.  At the end of the day, regardless of how we phrase it, prepping does cause you to think about death and destruction (to avoid it). Making peace with death is outside the parameters of the forum, but the only way I can really prep and not panic is by genuinely being at peace with eventually dying and losing people.  Some people are able to just not think about things, and if you’re one of them, that might be a happier/easier if less prepared path to go down. If you’re like me and can’t get there, though, hopefully this helps a little. 


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What are your softcore preps?
Featured 43
15

Hi,  Those are some great habits!! I often have oats for breakfast as well with flaxseed, fruit, and peanut butter mixed in. I’m trying to balance prep-friendly food with fresh fruits, veggies, and eggs, but I’ve got a ways to go.  The 2 in 1 out method sounds like a great plan. I haven’t quite gotten the family on board with it yet, but I’m trying. Intermittent fasting sounds like an amazing prep, and I’ve heard great things from friends and family who do it. I’m not to that level–if I ever will be–but I am trying to be mindful about what, when, and how much I eat.  Cooking and mending are two areas I’m trying to improve in as well. I can sew… kind of, but I’m far from where I want to be. There’s a few recipes I can make, but I’m not to the place where I could easily make dinner every night. Mom is adamant that I learn how to feed myself before I head to grad school and has been teaching me, so that skill I’m pretty confident will click with more time.  Oooh, good question. When I have a more permanent adult home (maybe grad school, maybe post grad school), I’d love to garden. Even if it’s just a few vegetables in a window, I love to get my hands dirty, and localizing food production is great for prepping and the environment (those often seem to go hand in hand). I also want to learn basic car maintenance. I’m not going to invest too much time into the ins and outs of a combustion engine because I’m not sure how much longer those will be standard, but knowing how to change a tire or how to jumpstart a battery both seem like important driving skills. 

Great topic!! The pandemic really illustrated how quickly medical stockpiles can run out. I’m by no means a medical professional, but this is what I’ve gathered from my own research and experience.  Bandages have historically been made with torn up fabric, but the reason we use gauze instead is because it’s a) sterile and b) designed to not have bits come off in the wound. While you could probably improvise decent bandages with cleaned cloth in a long term emergency, gauze is always a better choice if you have it on hand. Also, gauze is cheaper than a new shirt.  I’d really recommend you don’t use paper or non-medical tape. Toilet paper is designed to break up in water, and blood is mostly water. I’ve definitely used it to press on a cut that’s bleeding, but even for a small cut, it breaks up after a few minutes. Most tape does not stick to skin well, and stronger tapes run the risk of pulling up skin and leaving a bigger wound than before. (To be fair, my family has fragile skin, but duct tape on any wound sounds bad.)  In a long-term disaster, our best bet is probably going to be traditional medicine. They’re not usually as effective as modern medicine, but medicine was not invented in the last few centuries, and a lot of traditional remedies have legitimate effects. Some modern medicine is even made from artificial or purified traditional medicines. There’s other threads on here- I think even a starred one rn- that have recommendations with books for grid-down medicine.  All that said, there’s a lot of medical supplies you really can’t make well yourself. The human life expectancy used to be much shorter than it is now, and modern medicine has been a huge part of that. We’d be returning to a time where injuries or diseases we hardly notice today could easily cause death or disability. Accepting limitations to prepping is never fun, but with medicine, you have to. 

Thank you for the timely post!! The info about back doors and ricochet is also much appreciated!! My siblings and I all had separate gun threats at school this year (one of us had at least four), so I’ve done a lot of reading on this.  The last few years, they’ve been teaching Run Hide Fight in schools. It’s not very different from what you posted, but I’ve found the framework to be helpful for split second decision making.  Even though it feels counterintuitive, you have a better chance of living if you run rather than hide unless you’re running into the line of fire. Know how your building will go into lockdown. My campus has central, open stairways that they close a steel door over (for fire spread control). I doubt those close for a shooter, but I’m not running towards them just to be safe. Jumping out second story* windows is totally reasonable here.  *American second story, European first story Practicing how to barricade a door, especially in places like your office or classroom, can be helpful. Our classrooms have long, heavy tables with locking wheels that you’d need to latch if you wanted to actually barricade. That cabinet next to the door might be too heavy to realistically move, so do check! Also, make sure that the lights are off and that everyone has their phone on silent. If the doors have windows, hide out of view. You want the room to look as empty as possible.  Be very careful about who you open that door for. Shooters have pretended to be police. Hiding in a cabinet is great if that’s an option, but don’t count on being able to dump everything out of a cabinet to get inside it. Remember shooters are more likely to target places they’re familiar with, especially for schools, so don’t rely on established safety codes to be all that safe. The shooter could easily have taken the safety training with you and probably knows the response plan.  Fighting is the absolute last option for obvious reasons, but it’s an option. The plan at my middle/high school was to have someone stand just to the side of the door, against the wall so you can’t see them from the hallway, and whack the shooter with a chair really hard if they broke down the door. That idea sounds horribly useless in retrospect, but we couldn’t handle just huddling in a corner and waiting to die. I know shooters have been successfully tackled before, but the tackler was shot repeatedly in the process.  This probably goes without saying, but first responders are not there to help survivors. The first responders are a SWAT team, and you do not want them to get confused about what role you played.  Also, playing dead isn’t a great strategy because shooters will re-shoot bodies. It might work until the shooter leaves the room the first time (and has saved people’s lives when they were shot in the leg before), but you still need to try leaving ASAP.  When it comes to noticing potential shooters, you want as much information as possible. My sister saw another kid walk down the hallway and pretend to shoot into classrooms and reported it, but they couldn’t identify the student because she didn’t remember the time of the incident to check the security cameras for. Her school had four shooting threats later in graffiti that haven’t come to anything yet but have caused several lockdowns and canceled days. We still don’t know who wrote the graffiti.  Stay safe out there, y’all!

Hi Anthony, Awesome topic!! I have a few tricks that work for me but no comprehensive philosophy of mentally healthy prepping, haha.  Prepping is a healthy expression of anxiety to me. An awareness of how everything can fall apart doesn’t need to be emotionally negative, but it does take awhile to learn how to not be bothered by it. I just can’t lie to myself about things being safer than they really are, so not being aware isn’t an option for me regardless of prepping. I like to think of it as a game or puzzle.  I’m also careful not to let prepping make my life worse now. I’m not going to spend tons of time or money on it at the expense of the present, and I focus my prepping more on areas I enjoy (like first aid) and less on areas that I don’t (like hunting). Integrating prepping into everyday life helps with this too. Instead of the Zombie Survival Bag, it’s having a snack on hand or playing around with the tools that were (wisely) confiscated from me as a child.  Focusing like this is also an excuse to form community with people who have different interests and skills, which is both a great prep and a great mental health boost. And anyway, it’s more effective to really learn a few skills than kinda sorta know a lot of skills if you’ve got a prepping group.  At the end of the day, regardless of how we phrase it, prepping does cause you to think about death and destruction (to avoid it). Making peace with death is outside the parameters of the forum, but the only way I can really prep and not panic is by genuinely being at peace with eventually dying and losing people.  Some people are able to just not think about things, and if you’re one of them, that might be a happier/easier if less prepared path to go down. If you’re like me and can’t get there, though, hopefully this helps a little. 


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