Discussions
FIFO can racks for the pantry
6
4

Forager, We’ve tried to critically examine the potential for energy savings with the haybox, but there are other considerations as well.  One is preheating of most cooking utensils, not the least of which is the oven (electric in my case).  If I wanted to bake that batch of cornbread in the oven, I would first have to preheat the oven to 400 degrees, which one might think of as 20 minutes of almost wasted energy while the oven does nothing but preheat.  The pan of cornbread itself would take about 25 minutes to bake.  To preheat the water on the stovetop took about 10 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes to boil the food before placing in the box.  So overall, the corn bread took 20 minutes to come to a boil on a stovetop element, versus almost an hour of running an oven element.  If I wanted to cook something that required LONG cooking times, like dry beans, I would only have the expenditure of heating the beans and boiling them briefly before shutting off the energy source and placing the pot in the box. But energy savings is not the point, so much as having an excellent cooking device that can be used indoors in a grid down situation, whereas some campstoves, etc. are not safe to use indoors.  Additionally, the water can be boiled over sources of heat, like a woodstove, that are performing the function of warming the dwelling. Additionally, it doesn’t emit any odors that would attract unwanted guests. Cooking an additional dish in the boiling water container was a common practice.  But you also have the advantage, with clean double boiler water, of having your wash water, for dishes or body, at a very toasty temperature after the energy was expended to heat the water to cook the food. If you want to cook meat and potatoes/veggies in one pot, you would cook the meat for a few hours, take the pot out of the box, add veggies, return to boil (which would expend very little energy) and put back in the box.

I think a lot of the western wildfire problem is being way oversold as climate change, when it can actually be traced to millions of acres of beetle-killed timber, which is almost certainly a result of forest mismanagement. Driving over the crest of the Cascade Range can be a heartbreaking experience. Mother Nature is cleaning up our trainwreck by burning it down and starting over.  Also, a lot of human property loss is the direct result of more and more people moving into dense forest areas. These are people who expect to be saved by services that don’t exist near them.  Sound familiar? People that live in the middle of a kindling box should probably not be surprised to find themselves in the middle of a wildfire, yet they are.  I think that a lot of natural systems, such as water cycles, were almost irreparably broken 150-200 years ago by the voracious overgrazing  of western rangeland that is so fragile it was never able to recover.  A relative of mine keeps blaming the California drought on government and environmentalists without considering that California is a desert to begin with, that supports a groaning overload of humanity on stolen water.  He has a miniscule understanding of water cycles and blames the “desertification” occurring there on shutting off the water to agriculture and leaving the ground unplowed.  Everybody blames cows for everything, but I believe that returning a few million acres to grassland and managed grazing could go a long way to restoring water cycles and ending droughts. But of course everyone’s following the red herring. I agree the PNW has its warts, and I honestly think that having a little homestead here is becoming an unattainable dream for many.  We’ve considered moving away from the Willamette Valley many times, and now, in retrospect, we are VERY glad we didn’t cave to that impulse.


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FIFO can racks for the pantry
6
4
Sanitizing the rain tank
4
6
“Tamper resistant” door lock
9
7
DIY 12V shower
14
7
Dutch oven cooking
17
9
Storing emergency cash in a car safe
30
12

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Forager, We’ve tried to critically examine the potential for energy savings with the haybox, but there are other considerations as well.  One is preheating of most cooking utensils, not the least of which is the oven (electric in my case).  If I wanted to bake that batch of cornbread in the oven, I would first have to preheat the oven to 400 degrees, which one might think of as 20 minutes of almost wasted energy while the oven does nothing but preheat.  The pan of cornbread itself would take about 25 minutes to bake.  To preheat the water on the stovetop took about 10 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes to boil the food before placing in the box.  So overall, the corn bread took 20 minutes to come to a boil on a stovetop element, versus almost an hour of running an oven element.  If I wanted to cook something that required LONG cooking times, like dry beans, I would only have the expenditure of heating the beans and boiling them briefly before shutting off the energy source and placing the pot in the box. But energy savings is not the point, so much as having an excellent cooking device that can be used indoors in a grid down situation, whereas some campstoves, etc. are not safe to use indoors.  Additionally, the water can be boiled over sources of heat, like a woodstove, that are performing the function of warming the dwelling. Additionally, it doesn’t emit any odors that would attract unwanted guests. Cooking an additional dish in the boiling water container was a common practice.  But you also have the advantage, with clean double boiler water, of having your wash water, for dishes or body, at a very toasty temperature after the energy was expended to heat the water to cook the food. If you want to cook meat and potatoes/veggies in one pot, you would cook the meat for a few hours, take the pot out of the box, add veggies, return to boil (which would expend very little energy) and put back in the box.

I think a lot of the western wildfire problem is being way oversold as climate change, when it can actually be traced to millions of acres of beetle-killed timber, which is almost certainly a result of forest mismanagement. Driving over the crest of the Cascade Range can be a heartbreaking experience. Mother Nature is cleaning up our trainwreck by burning it down and starting over.  Also, a lot of human property loss is the direct result of more and more people moving into dense forest areas. These are people who expect to be saved by services that don’t exist near them.  Sound familiar? People that live in the middle of a kindling box should probably not be surprised to find themselves in the middle of a wildfire, yet they are.  I think that a lot of natural systems, such as water cycles, were almost irreparably broken 150-200 years ago by the voracious overgrazing  of western rangeland that is so fragile it was never able to recover.  A relative of mine keeps blaming the California drought on government and environmentalists without considering that California is a desert to begin with, that supports a groaning overload of humanity on stolen water.  He has a miniscule understanding of water cycles and blames the “desertification” occurring there on shutting off the water to agriculture and leaving the ground unplowed.  Everybody blames cows for everything, but I believe that returning a few million acres to grassland and managed grazing could go a long way to restoring water cycles and ending droughts. But of course everyone’s following the red herring. I agree the PNW has its warts, and I honestly think that having a little homestead here is becoming an unattainable dream for many.  We’ve considered moving away from the Willamette Valley many times, and now, in retrospect, we are VERY glad we didn’t cave to that impulse.


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