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There are a few parts to this that are going on, heat injury, dehydration, and possibly some sunburns.  For the heat injury part cooling off, including active cooling (especially if there is altered mental status) is key.  Get out of the sun, into a cool spot, and use water to help the cooling process.  For example wetting clothing with water, or if in a wilderness situation getting into a stream or a lake (if safe to do so and with help if available) will drop temp fast. Remember this is for environmental heat injury and not fever (especially in pediatrics).   Prevention can go a long way.  The umbrella and hat a great ideas.  A canopy or sun shelter is also good depending on situation.  I do a lot of climbing on sun exposed slabs that are long and one of the keys to not getting as hot or sunburned is actually a long sleeve sun shirt.  They have UV protective ratings, and are light colored.  They also are more of a tech wick type material so help with cooling through facilitating evaporation.  I love the hooded ones, but there are also button up ones that are actually a bit lighter and have nice venting in the back.  This is a massive improvement over any sort of sunblock goop. For the dehydration part it is always better to go into a hot day in the field with a good hydration status, however most of us know beer is sometimes too tasty.  So constant hydration throughout the day is key.  Trying to catch up after getting dehydrated, even a bit, is hard since you might be trying to stuff more water in than the transport rate through the gut.  The transport rate is actually affected by the presence of sugars, so things with small amounts of sugars are useful, however Gatorade and the like are too heavy in sugars.  Look for things made for endurance athletes instead.  In situations where you feel you are really starting to get dehydrated, urinary output is diminishing, and the such consider switching to a WHO rehydration salt mix.  All of my wilderness med kits have some WHO rehydration packets because dehydration can come up fast out in the field.  


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Tips for pets? – Pet Preparedness
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There are a few parts to this that are going on, heat injury, dehydration, and possibly some sunburns.  For the heat injury part cooling off, including active cooling (especially if there is altered mental status) is key.  Get out of the sun, into a cool spot, and use water to help the cooling process.  For example wetting clothing with water, or if in a wilderness situation getting into a stream or a lake (if safe to do so and with help if available) will drop temp fast. Remember this is for environmental heat injury and not fever (especially in pediatrics).   Prevention can go a long way.  The umbrella and hat a great ideas.  A canopy or sun shelter is also good depending on situation.  I do a lot of climbing on sun exposed slabs that are long and one of the keys to not getting as hot or sunburned is actually a long sleeve sun shirt.  They have UV protective ratings, and are light colored.  They also are more of a tech wick type material so help with cooling through facilitating evaporation.  I love the hooded ones, but there are also button up ones that are actually a bit lighter and have nice venting in the back.  This is a massive improvement over any sort of sunblock goop. For the dehydration part it is always better to go into a hot day in the field with a good hydration status, however most of us know beer is sometimes too tasty.  So constant hydration throughout the day is key.  Trying to catch up after getting dehydrated, even a bit, is hard since you might be trying to stuff more water in than the transport rate through the gut.  The transport rate is actually affected by the presence of sugars, so things with small amounts of sugars are useful, however Gatorade and the like are too heavy in sugars.  Look for things made for endurance athletes instead.  In situations where you feel you are really starting to get dehydrated, urinary output is diminishing, and the such consider switching to a WHO rehydration salt mix.  All of my wilderness med kits have some WHO rehydration packets because dehydration can come up fast out in the field.  


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