Discussions

Let me try to make this a little simpler (for me anyway). My overriding reason for having an air filter is that I live in Northern California, about an hour or two away from where some of the worst wildfires have happened in the past few years. In two consecutive years, the air quality in my whole region during these fires was TERRIBLE. At one point the worst on the planet. I am actually not in the areas usually hit worst, but it’s bad enough! In 2017 there were many days when we weren’t even supposed to go outside, and you hardly wanted to because of all the smoke in the air. Additional complications: I live in a 100 year old house with lots of air leaks and I am a person who can’t bear to live for long stretches of time with windows closed. I particularly can’t sleep with a closed window. I have to open it at least a little. I got the air filter after the last round of fires thinking I really need to be prepared to hunker down in a room and keep the air as fresh as possible there. I haven’t used it for real yet (only to measure electrical load) so I don’t know how long I would need to run it or at what speed. I did a test of the electrical usage for the filter at its highest speed. It was 53 watts over the course of an hour (compared to 41 watts for my CPAP). I haven’t tried testing it at its lower settings. CPAP use and air filtration if the air is bad enough are neck in neck for me as first priorities in an extended power outage. If the air is bad enough I would take the air filtration over CPAP, although so far I’ve managed without it, so I guess it has to get pretty bad. The solar generator I’m eyeing at the moment is the Ecoflow Delta which has a total Wh rating of around 1300, so about 1000 of that is usable. It does charge very fast if you have it rigged up to enough solar panels — which I probably won’t have all of at the beginning because I can’t afford it. I could run both the CPAP and the air filter for some time on that power, and hope I can recharge it quickly in a day or so before I run out of watt hours. The problem with air filters is that you’re really supposed to run them for a big chunk of the time. Some people advise 12 hours, some 24/7! So, okay. If I get out of the technicalities, the basic question for me is, what do I do if there are wildfires, the air has gotten really bad, and the power goes out? This is actually a very realistic scenario since our power company has been shutting off the power at exactly such times. They tell people to stay inside and use their air filters and then they shut off the electricity! My specific house has never been affected by that, but it could be. In the past I’ve managed without air filtration partly by leaving the area (harder to do during COVID-19) and partly by just wearing a mask in the house part of the time and hoping for the best. That’s low tech, but doesn’t feel quite secure.


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Let me try to make this a little simpler (for me anyway). My overriding reason for having an air filter is that I live in Northern California, about an hour or two away from where some of the worst wildfires have happened in the past few years. In two consecutive years, the air quality in my whole region during these fires was TERRIBLE. At one point the worst on the planet. I am actually not in the areas usually hit worst, but it’s bad enough! In 2017 there were many days when we weren’t even supposed to go outside, and you hardly wanted to because of all the smoke in the air. Additional complications: I live in a 100 year old house with lots of air leaks and I am a person who can’t bear to live for long stretches of time with windows closed. I particularly can’t sleep with a closed window. I have to open it at least a little. I got the air filter after the last round of fires thinking I really need to be prepared to hunker down in a room and keep the air as fresh as possible there. I haven’t used it for real yet (only to measure electrical load) so I don’t know how long I would need to run it or at what speed. I did a test of the electrical usage for the filter at its highest speed. It was 53 watts over the course of an hour (compared to 41 watts for my CPAP). I haven’t tried testing it at its lower settings. CPAP use and air filtration if the air is bad enough are neck in neck for me as first priorities in an extended power outage. If the air is bad enough I would take the air filtration over CPAP, although so far I’ve managed without it, so I guess it has to get pretty bad. The solar generator I’m eyeing at the moment is the Ecoflow Delta which has a total Wh rating of around 1300, so about 1000 of that is usable. It does charge very fast if you have it rigged up to enough solar panels — which I probably won’t have all of at the beginning because I can’t afford it. I could run both the CPAP and the air filter for some time on that power, and hope I can recharge it quickly in a day or so before I run out of watt hours. The problem with air filters is that you’re really supposed to run them for a big chunk of the time. Some people advise 12 hours, some 24/7! So, okay. If I get out of the technicalities, the basic question for me is, what do I do if there are wildfires, the air has gotten really bad, and the power goes out? This is actually a very realistic scenario since our power company has been shutting off the power at exactly such times. They tell people to stay inside and use their air filters and then they shut off the electricity! My specific house has never been affected by that, but it could be. In the past I’ve managed without air filtration partly by leaving the area (harder to do during COVID-19) and partly by just wearing a mask in the house part of the time and hoping for the best. That’s low tech, but doesn’t feel quite secure.


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