Discussions

Reporting in about…. impeller washing machines. A one-word summary for those who do not have time to read: AAAAAGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! My family wanted to put their heads together to select a washing machine, so I left them to it. I had NO idea they were looking at impeller machines. They even bought it, which was a surprise, and which I thought was so sweet- until we started using it. Note to self… do not slack off and farm out my research! Among my complaints are: It does not fill even remotely adequately. It does a little shuffling of the clothes during the wash cycle, not very vigorous. I don’t see how it could get badly soiled clothes even remotely clean. It causes the electricity to flicker for every back and forth motion of the wash cycle, unlike any machine we have had prior to this. It takes 40 minutes for the rinse water to fill, again barely adequately. It does not do what passes for agitation during the rinse cycle, but once the less-than-generous amount of rinse water has dribbled in, it goes immediately to spin. It spins, and goes through the motions of draining each time, at least four times. I finally forced a shut-off after the fourth drain-and-spin cycle. I would have never selected an impeller machine, because I wash things like small rugs that have been trampled by dogs, and I can tell by a cursory glance at reviews that it would not be appropriate.  It wouldn’t take any longer. I started washing laundry at 7:15 and got done (with one load) at almost 10 pm. I forgot to mention that if one hits the stop button, the machine goes back to the beginning of the wash cycle, although you may be able to force it to go to a “rinse and spin” choice or a “drain and spin” choice, which I did near the end of the ordeal. The clothing needed more washing anyway, since the first wash cycle had barely any water, so I let it go back to the beginning. If I leave it to its own devices (which I was still figuring out since it was so slow at everything, and so thrifty with the allotment of water), it would take at least 1.5 hours per load, including the 40 minute filling of the rinse cycle. Not how I planned to spend the evening! I videoed it all, which I won’t post anywhere, just was documenting in case we have any trouble returning it. I don’t know if all of the above is normal for impeller machines, but I do know from my reading today that they do not give you much water, and also that they lower the “hot” to about 90 degrees, even if your heater is set to 120.

Sometimes I ask myself “How many of x thing would I really need, if SHTF?” and if the answer is one, and I have ten, I might think about getting rid of five to see if I suddenly remember a use for them. I certainly won’t get rid of something that I like, that might be useful, that has sentimental value, even, just because someone in the future might get irritated. If something is starting to annoy me or be in my way, I will deal with it at that time. I am not planning ahead for “what if I decide I don’t need the thing.” I do not expect my parents or older family members, people who are said to be of a certain mindset because they are chronologically in one generation or another, to change their habits or get rid of things I personally can see no use for because it might inconvenience those of us who are younger who might have to dispose of some of their stuff if they meet their demise before we do. If/when it comes to that, if I am in charge of said stuff, I will keep what might be mine to keep, make sure other things go to the appropriate people, and give away or toss the rest. I save some things that have been listed here as junk or as silly hoarding, and I smile to myself, because I know that “they don’t make them like they used to” and so I save the thing, even if I might not have to use it. I have had to use something I saved for years, and was probably a bit smug when I pulled out the thing and made the repair. As for any younger generations that might have to “deal with” my stuff, they have all sorts of options, and I do not plan my life around what someone might think about me in the future when it no longer matters to me. If I die 5 minutes from now, they will have some work to do.


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Reporting in about…. impeller washing machines. A one-word summary for those who do not have time to read: AAAAAGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! My family wanted to put their heads together to select a washing machine, so I left them to it. I had NO idea they were looking at impeller machines. They even bought it, which was a surprise, and which I thought was so sweet- until we started using it. Note to self… do not slack off and farm out my research! Among my complaints are: It does not fill even remotely adequately. It does a little shuffling of the clothes during the wash cycle, not very vigorous. I don’t see how it could get badly soiled clothes even remotely clean. It causes the electricity to flicker for every back and forth motion of the wash cycle, unlike any machine we have had prior to this. It takes 40 minutes for the rinse water to fill, again barely adequately. It does not do what passes for agitation during the rinse cycle, but once the less-than-generous amount of rinse water has dribbled in, it goes immediately to spin. It spins, and goes through the motions of draining each time, at least four times. I finally forced a shut-off after the fourth drain-and-spin cycle. I would have never selected an impeller machine, because I wash things like small rugs that have been trampled by dogs, and I can tell by a cursory glance at reviews that it would not be appropriate.  It wouldn’t take any longer. I started washing laundry at 7:15 and got done (with one load) at almost 10 pm. I forgot to mention that if one hits the stop button, the machine goes back to the beginning of the wash cycle, although you may be able to force it to go to a “rinse and spin” choice or a “drain and spin” choice, which I did near the end of the ordeal. The clothing needed more washing anyway, since the first wash cycle had barely any water, so I let it go back to the beginning. If I leave it to its own devices (which I was still figuring out since it was so slow at everything, and so thrifty with the allotment of water), it would take at least 1.5 hours per load, including the 40 minute filling of the rinse cycle. Not how I planned to spend the evening! I videoed it all, which I won’t post anywhere, just was documenting in case we have any trouble returning it. I don’t know if all of the above is normal for impeller machines, but I do know from my reading today that they do not give you much water, and also that they lower the “hot” to about 90 degrees, even if your heater is set to 120.

Sometimes I ask myself “How many of x thing would I really need, if SHTF?” and if the answer is one, and I have ten, I might think about getting rid of five to see if I suddenly remember a use for them. I certainly won’t get rid of something that I like, that might be useful, that has sentimental value, even, just because someone in the future might get irritated. If something is starting to annoy me or be in my way, I will deal with it at that time. I am not planning ahead for “what if I decide I don’t need the thing.” I do not expect my parents or older family members, people who are said to be of a certain mindset because they are chronologically in one generation or another, to change their habits or get rid of things I personally can see no use for because it might inconvenience those of us who are younger who might have to dispose of some of their stuff if they meet their demise before we do. If/when it comes to that, if I am in charge of said stuff, I will keep what might be mine to keep, make sure other things go to the appropriate people, and give away or toss the rest. I save some things that have been listed here as junk or as silly hoarding, and I smile to myself, because I know that “they don’t make them like they used to” and so I save the thing, even if I might not have to use it. I have had to use something I saved for years, and was probably a bit smug when I pulled out the thing and made the repair. As for any younger generations that might have to “deal with” my stuff, they have all sorts of options, and I do not plan my life around what someone might think about me in the future when it no longer matters to me. If I die 5 minutes from now, they will have some work to do.


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