12

What to say to kids instead of “be careful!”

Thought this was worth sharing with any parents. I like the spirit behind this idea – get their brains configured the right way early on! You can see how small differences in wording make the difference between being average and having an aware/prepper mindset.

12

  • Comments (12)

    • 4

      I’m a parent and this is actually pretty timely. As I’ve been around my kids more during the SIP orders, I have sort of tried to find different ways of saying things I normally say simply because I’m saying them more often. Does that make sense?

      Using the example in the pic, I feel like I say “be careful” constantly during playtime, like a mindless auto-reaction. So partly to make myself feel more sane, I’ve started mixing it up. I’ll say “that’s scary, right?” or things like that to make them more aware of what’s actually dangerous instead of just warning them constantly.

      But this strikes me as a no brainer and worthwhile! Good advice!

      • 3

        What is SIP?

      • 3

        Sorry! Shelter In Place. What we were doing the last few months with the virus.

      • 3

        TIL (Today I learned…)

    • 4

      This is excellent, thanks so much for sharing. I’m a childhood educator and this is very similar to how I narrate for my own kids and my students. Framing is everything.

    • 2

      My mom was an English teacher, so she would use phrases like this, partially to make me more aware of the world (I hope) but also to get me to describe things more often, which led to being better with words as I got older. I know that’s not the point of the image, but it’s a nice byproduct of asking more exploratory questions.

      • 2

        I might be remembering wrong, but I recall friends who are Montessori teachers saying they use similar language with kids because there are multiple benefits, one of which is what you said about vocabulary and being descriptive. I think another benefit was it helping develop more of a sense of confidence and autonomy.

    • 3

      Nailed it. Parents should leap on any chance to get their kids to vocalize the world around them. Even if it’s the scary stuff. It emboldens them because they get experience early on talking things out. There was some research back in the late 2000s about how kids need to hear a certain number of words everyday in order to develop fully during their first few years. I think it was 30,000. I don’t know if that was proven or not, but it stuck with me. And the alternatives in the image are a lot better for conversations than just yelling every time children encounter something outdoors.

      I found this link since it’s on my mind now:

      https://www.education.com/magazine/article/30000_words/

    • 4

      I’m not a parent, but this struck a cord with me as my mum only blocked me from doing any kind of activity that was even remotely adventurous. Like climb the taller childrens slide in my playground. It took me a long time to get over my fears (and still working on them) so kudos on all the parents here who ancourage their childrens development in a sane manner.

    • 3

      My old Army buddy says, as parents, we say “be careful” when we really don’t want the kids to do what they’re getting ready to do, but don’t have a good reason to tell them no 🙂

      This is a great idea. Helping them be more specific and be more aware of their surroundings are skills that will last a lifetime.

    • 4

      I like you list and will use it. Ive been using “when” language instead of “if” language for a while. This empowers them to think through a situation and to expect that it could occur.

      ex: When you get lost in the mall what will you do?