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Tourniquets

 TQ OTHER TQ SELF WOUND PACKING PRESSURE DRESSING PRESSURE DRESSING SELF[See the full post at: Tourniquets]

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  • Comments (7)

    • 4

      Great to see good ways to apply the Torniquets on oneself and also to see the different types in case one has to use another model than personally owned (even though training with different models would be best it is good to have an idea about the differences).

    • 2

      Nice to see the course includes videos of how to use the top recommended gear from The Prepared IFAK articles.

      Suggestion: Since this is important to only use tourniquets on arms and legs, what do you think about repeating that directly in the first sentence – “Tourniquets are for use on extremities ONLY (arms and legs).”

    • 3

      In the second video here, where Tom applies a TQ to their dominant arm, they say something about not pre-staging the TQ with the assumption that you’ll be self-applying. Why not do the exact opposite? If I’m applying the TQ to myself, I want it to be staged in a way that’s easiest, because it’ll already be harder (because I’m applying it to myself). If I’m applying it to myself, I’ll likely have full motor control, and can overcome the difficulty of de-threading the TQ strap from the buckle.

      • 1

        I’ve updated the text notes to clarify. But some thoughts: 

        1. If your arm is blown off or crushed, you might be overestimating your ability to be mentally calm with full motor control 🙂
        2. When Tom talked about staging, he meant whether the strap is already in a closed loop or not. 
        3. Dethreading / opening an already-closed loop is an extra step / risk you don’t need.
        4. All that said, if you practice and find it’s just better for you to stage with a pre-built loop, then go ahead. Some pros and teachers do it that way, too. 
      • 2

        Don’t assume you’ll have full or partial use of your arm/leg during tq application.  

        Example: If the nerves are damaged, that arm/leg may not be able to move at all.  Let alone any catastrophic muscle damage caused by the mechanism of injury.