Kits (2)
Discussions

This is a great topic idea. I’m really enjoying reading other people’s why-I-started stories! I date my prepping to two specific events, the more recent of which being the day I got my dog, when he was 9 weeks old. I was in my twenties and it was the first time I had been responsible for anyone other than myself. It was also sort of the first time I was responsible for my own self, in the sense that I had just moved (alone) to a really small town, and I had never lived in a super rural area where basic services were kind of fragile. The main road connecting us to civilization would flood in big storms, power outages were just part of life in the winter, running out of water was a thing in the summer, and sometimes I ran out of propane, too. I had always kept an earthquake kit in my house and some emergency supplies in my car, but I had also ignored some really basic elements of preparedness that seemed inconvenient or annoying, like storing water. That changed when I felt like I was truly on my own in the middle of nowhere, except for this actual living creature who was counting on me. The other event to which I credit my prepping was the Loma Prieta earthquake, which I experienced as a kid in San Francisco. I remember it pretty vividly, and some of what happened to people close to me was pretty instructive for prepping purposes. My mom was landing at SFO when the quake hit, and she had to sort of bushwhack through the city after dark to get home, on a quarter of a tank of gas with no streetlights, traffic signals, or maps. She thought she was going to run out of gas and have to abandon the car and walk— in her business suit and high heels.  When I got older I started reading about the 1906 earthquake and about the geology of California. When I was in sixth grade, I saw an ad in the paper for an earthquake preparedness store in Ghirardelli Square and I begged my mom to take me there. Not just once, either. I wanted to go pretty much every weekend, which made my mom crazy because Ghiradelli Square is a crowded, touristy nightmare where parking is impossible and everything is overpriced. I think she finally bought our first two-person 72-hour pre-packaged earthquake kit to get me off her back about going to the preparedness store. I remember lovingly unpacking and inventorying the kit, and repacking it just so. Suffice to say, while the acquisition of the dog definitely catalyzed my prepping as an adult, I’ve had the bug for a long time, and I’m pretty sure that watching my city go to hell when I was five was how that all actually started.

I’m not really asking for any preps— mainly just some new clothing items to keep me warm while working from home, running, and hiking— but I am giving preps! One of the things I try to do for my mom every couple of years is go through her earthquake kit and replace or add the most crucial things and then give her a list of the other things to acquire or do over the course of the year, and we talk through all of it so she’s learning. She really appreciates it, and I usually do this in addition to getting her a couple of non-prepping things. My father and stepmother, on the other hand, are really flippant about preparedness. When I asked them what they had on hand for emergencies a couple of years ago, my dad said, “Alcohol,” and my stepmother yelled from another room, “And chocolate! Don’t forget the chocolate!” They live 5 miles from the trace of one of the largest and most dangerous faults in North America, on liquefaction-prone soil, and they have three dogs who will depend on them after the inevitable earthquake. So I, um, sometimes am a little less nice to them and JUST give them prepping stuff. (Since my dad doesn’t care about receiving gifts and is notoriously uncooperative about telling me what he wants/needs, I don’t feel bad about this at all.) I actually bought them a prepackaged earthquake kit a couple of years back because I was so horrified by the state of their preparedness. My thinking was, “I can upgrade the inferior items in future years, but they just need the basics immediately.” I did not anticipate being unable to access the kit or their garage in those future years to assess what they have and what they need— which of course I can’t now because of Covid. So I’m going to go back through my Amazon order history to try to forensically construct an inventory of their preps on the (probably fair) assumption that what I’ve given them is all they have.

I agree with NazSMD’s layering suggestion. To bring the price down, I wonder about planning to repurpose/rotate items out of your regular wardrobe and/or thrifting. This is how I packed my BOB with clothes. For example, here is all my upper body stuff: a UPF 50 longsleeve sunshirt that I bought originally for running and then used for home improvement projects before it was sent to the BOB a zip-neck fleece pullover that my friend found at one of those pay-by-the-pound thrift stores an old down jacket, originally bought on sale in January (when all the warm stuff gets discounted!), that I wore for six winters and had to stop using as my go-to because it was in rough aesthetic shape and had lost some warmth a rain jacket we got for free from a workplace lost and found just before long-unclaimed items were donated The fleece and the down jacket would easily have cost >$300 new— and when they were new, they would have been too bulky to fit easily in my BOB. The down jacket is not as warm as it once was, but with the fleece, I think it’ll be fine. Granted, we do a lot of outdoor sports in my household and friend group, so there is a certain amount of technical outwear getting acquired and abused and seeking a second or third home or role in my orbit, which I know is not the case for everyone! But you can try apps like Poshmark and those extra-super-cheap thrift store “last call” centers (the only one I’ve been to— which was in NorCal— was located in an industrial garage type building with huge roll-up garage-style doors that were kept open, so those types of setups might even be Covid-friendly). Wool button-down shirts are another good item that could be relatively easy to thrift or e-thrift, and if you get warm easily, jackets with pit zips are great for temp regulation. Hope some of those ideas are helpful!

@A2, I will check out Redbarn— thank you! And @Gideon, we already do Vital Essentials for training treats; I didn’t realize they made complete meals! That’s great! My dog can easily carry 5 lbs of weight (he’s a husky mix, so medium/large and very high energy— we give him weight to carry on hikes just so he’ll actually be tired at the end of the day); it’s the volume and packaging that poses the problem for having him carry his own food— i.e., given the need to distribute the 5-lb bag between two dog pack saddle bags in order for him to carry it. I always figured that I would just carry the 5-lb bag, myself, which would be fine for a relatively relaxed bug out. For a more serious stealthy/speedy bug out, I have some vacuum-packed long-shelf-life kibble in my BOB, but it’s not his kibble, so I really see that as a nuclear option: My dog is strong in paw and heart but weak in gut. This is why freeze-dried is appealing: He already eats this exact stuff every day. We also live in a wet part of the country and have multiple purification options, a lot of water without walking distance, and a lot of stored water for sheltering in place, but that’s not to say that the water factor doesn’t bother me at all. Tubes could be an ideal solution if I could find something that meets our ingredient specs such that I could feed him that same food regularly. I’ve been thinking for a long time that what I really need to do is start vacuum-packing his kibble myself; figuring out what that would take in terms of supplies and skills has been on my to-do list for a while. I almost started a thread a while back asking for advice on this, actually… I’m still getting used to the fact that I’m not the only person out there who obsesses over this sort of thing. 😀

Preparedness podcasts?
15
16

Load more...
Preparedness podcasts?
15
16

This is a great topic idea. I’m really enjoying reading other people’s why-I-started stories! I date my prepping to two specific events, the more recent of which being the day I got my dog, when he was 9 weeks old. I was in my twenties and it was the first time I had been responsible for anyone other than myself. It was also sort of the first time I was responsible for my own self, in the sense that I had just moved (alone) to a really small town, and I had never lived in a super rural area where basic services were kind of fragile. The main road connecting us to civilization would flood in big storms, power outages were just part of life in the winter, running out of water was a thing in the summer, and sometimes I ran out of propane, too. I had always kept an earthquake kit in my house and some emergency supplies in my car, but I had also ignored some really basic elements of preparedness that seemed inconvenient or annoying, like storing water. That changed when I felt like I was truly on my own in the middle of nowhere, except for this actual living creature who was counting on me. The other event to which I credit my prepping was the Loma Prieta earthquake, which I experienced as a kid in San Francisco. I remember it pretty vividly, and some of what happened to people close to me was pretty instructive for prepping purposes. My mom was landing at SFO when the quake hit, and she had to sort of bushwhack through the city after dark to get home, on a quarter of a tank of gas with no streetlights, traffic signals, or maps. She thought she was going to run out of gas and have to abandon the car and walk— in her business suit and high heels.  When I got older I started reading about the 1906 earthquake and about the geology of California. When I was in sixth grade, I saw an ad in the paper for an earthquake preparedness store in Ghirardelli Square and I begged my mom to take me there. Not just once, either. I wanted to go pretty much every weekend, which made my mom crazy because Ghiradelli Square is a crowded, touristy nightmare where parking is impossible and everything is overpriced. I think she finally bought our first two-person 72-hour pre-packaged earthquake kit to get me off her back about going to the preparedness store. I remember lovingly unpacking and inventorying the kit, and repacking it just so. Suffice to say, while the acquisition of the dog definitely catalyzed my prepping as an adult, I’ve had the bug for a long time, and I’m pretty sure that watching my city go to hell when I was five was how that all actually started.

I’m not really asking for any preps— mainly just some new clothing items to keep me warm while working from home, running, and hiking— but I am giving preps! One of the things I try to do for my mom every couple of years is go through her earthquake kit and replace or add the most crucial things and then give her a list of the other things to acquire or do over the course of the year, and we talk through all of it so she’s learning. She really appreciates it, and I usually do this in addition to getting her a couple of non-prepping things. My father and stepmother, on the other hand, are really flippant about preparedness. When I asked them what they had on hand for emergencies a couple of years ago, my dad said, “Alcohol,” and my stepmother yelled from another room, “And chocolate! Don’t forget the chocolate!” They live 5 miles from the trace of one of the largest and most dangerous faults in North America, on liquefaction-prone soil, and they have three dogs who will depend on them after the inevitable earthquake. So I, um, sometimes am a little less nice to them and JUST give them prepping stuff. (Since my dad doesn’t care about receiving gifts and is notoriously uncooperative about telling me what he wants/needs, I don’t feel bad about this at all.) I actually bought them a prepackaged earthquake kit a couple of years back because I was so horrified by the state of their preparedness. My thinking was, “I can upgrade the inferior items in future years, but they just need the basics immediately.” I did not anticipate being unable to access the kit or their garage in those future years to assess what they have and what they need— which of course I can’t now because of Covid. So I’m going to go back through my Amazon order history to try to forensically construct an inventory of their preps on the (probably fair) assumption that what I’ve given them is all they have.

I agree with NazSMD’s layering suggestion. To bring the price down, I wonder about planning to repurpose/rotate items out of your regular wardrobe and/or thrifting. This is how I packed my BOB with clothes. For example, here is all my upper body stuff: a UPF 50 longsleeve sunshirt that I bought originally for running and then used for home improvement projects before it was sent to the BOB a zip-neck fleece pullover that my friend found at one of those pay-by-the-pound thrift stores an old down jacket, originally bought on sale in January (when all the warm stuff gets discounted!), that I wore for six winters and had to stop using as my go-to because it was in rough aesthetic shape and had lost some warmth a rain jacket we got for free from a workplace lost and found just before long-unclaimed items were donated The fleece and the down jacket would easily have cost >$300 new— and when they were new, they would have been too bulky to fit easily in my BOB. The down jacket is not as warm as it once was, but with the fleece, I think it’ll be fine. Granted, we do a lot of outdoor sports in my household and friend group, so there is a certain amount of technical outwear getting acquired and abused and seeking a second or third home or role in my orbit, which I know is not the case for everyone! But you can try apps like Poshmark and those extra-super-cheap thrift store “last call” centers (the only one I’ve been to— which was in NorCal— was located in an industrial garage type building with huge roll-up garage-style doors that were kept open, so those types of setups might even be Covid-friendly). Wool button-down shirts are another good item that could be relatively easy to thrift or e-thrift, and if you get warm easily, jackets with pit zips are great for temp regulation. Hope some of those ideas are helpful!

@A2, I will check out Redbarn— thank you! And @Gideon, we already do Vital Essentials for training treats; I didn’t realize they made complete meals! That’s great! My dog can easily carry 5 lbs of weight (he’s a husky mix, so medium/large and very high energy— we give him weight to carry on hikes just so he’ll actually be tired at the end of the day); it’s the volume and packaging that poses the problem for having him carry his own food— i.e., given the need to distribute the 5-lb bag between two dog pack saddle bags in order for him to carry it. I always figured that I would just carry the 5-lb bag, myself, which would be fine for a relatively relaxed bug out. For a more serious stealthy/speedy bug out, I have some vacuum-packed long-shelf-life kibble in my BOB, but it’s not his kibble, so I really see that as a nuclear option: My dog is strong in paw and heart but weak in gut. This is why freeze-dried is appealing: He already eats this exact stuff every day. We also live in a wet part of the country and have multiple purification options, a lot of water without walking distance, and a lot of stored water for sheltering in place, but that’s not to say that the water factor doesn’t bother me at all. Tubes could be an ideal solution if I could find something that meets our ingredient specs such that I could feed him that same food regularly. I’ve been thinking for a long time that what I really need to do is start vacuum-packing his kibble myself; figuring out what that would take in terms of supplies and skills has been on my to-do list for a while. I almost started a thread a while back asking for advice on this, actually… I’m still getting used to the fact that I’m not the only person out there who obsesses over this sort of thing. 😀


Load more...