Discussions

I agree mostly with what Pops says. I keep a first aid kit with dressings but my medicine cabinet contains the following – this is everyday use rather than end of the world supplies! Paracetamol (acetaminophen) I keep lots of this as it can be used for fever and pain. Ibuprofen to take down swelling. It’s not suitable for everyone though  I keep Chlorphenamine, an antihistamine, we don’t really have allergies in my family but this can be used to quickly treat allergic reactions. However it can make you sleepy so you need to be aware of that! I agree with Pops that cold medicines are not worth bothering with but I do keep menthol crystals with can be dissolved in hot water for steam inhalation. This is great to help with congestion but steam alone will also help. It can help when you get to the productive cough stage of a cold as well – for me this is much more cost effective than buying anti-mucolytics. Magnesium Sulphate paste which is used as a drawing ointment. A small packet of Imodium but plenty of rehydration sachets. I know you can make your own rehydration solution but tbh when I’m sick or I’m dealing with other people being sick a commercial product is easier to use. In my mind, diarrhoea is similar to coughing, the body’s way of trying to get rid of bad things but in case of upset stomachs I tend to resort to the BRAT diet!  Antibiotic resistance is something that worries me and access to antibiotic creams here tends to be prescription only so I don’t keep them although I have been known to keep the tubes if they’ve been prescribed and not completely finished! I do keep anti-septics and sudocrem. Other than that I keep sterile saline pods for eye and wound washing, tick removers,  I don’t keep low dose aspirin but perhaps I should as I’m now heading into that age category! Skincare is also really important, healthy skin will heal much quicker than dry skin. It is also less prone to damaged in the first place – So time to get moisturising!!  I’m a great believer that keeping active, especially outside, limiting processed foods and keeping healthy are the best ways to avoid problems but that’s just my opinion. 

I had considered the pots and pans and again it’s a situation thing; I could use the pans to collect rain water during the storm and possibly for cooking but I have food for 7 days and 10 days of potable water if I’m not rescued by then I may regret not having the pans😅but necessity is the mother of invention!  The rope could be improvised with the right vegetation. I’ve made nettle rope before at a living history museum. Equally I could probably improvise a bag but I’m thinking I may be hiking through difficult territory and a decent backpack is going to reduce strain! But maybe it’s not an osprey 60 – maybe is rainbow shimmer fashion backpack used to carry someone’s chihuahua for instagram purposes 😱 (in which case I’m taking the pans😂) I will be keeping the compass though! Yes the sun rises in the east and sets in the west but how dense is the vegetation? How about when the sky is overcast? Or you get caught in the half light?  I generally have a good sense of direction but I’m not prepared to rely on it in this situation. I know how easy it is to become disoriented if you’re hungry or dehydrated so the compass stays!  If natural navigation interests you, Eric, you may enjoy Tristan Goodley’s books.  I’m not sure the maps are going to be much help unless you’re close enough to make a successful crossing to safety. Given that my only transport option is a liferaft with a sail, I’m going to be at the mercy of both wind and current and my presumably much better equipped boat/ship failed I’m not sure if I’m risking that?  They may be able to tell you which direction help is likely to come from? The only other reason I would keep the maps would be to use the paper for drawing my own resources map of the island! 

Here’s my list: 1 Tents – there’s a storm coming so I want shelter and I probably don’t have time to build one from scratch! 2 Matches – I need some way to keep warm, boil water and cook any wild food I find. 3 Knife – I’m hoping this is a decent bush craft knife that I can use for multiple purposes and not just from the silverware drawer😉 4 Water – while I know water is essential I’m on the fence a little with this as it would depend on the circumstances of the time. Is this a single 10 gallon container in which case, how am I going to move it? Do I need to move it? Is it far enough up the beach that it may survive the storm? Is it obvious there is a fresh water source nearby?  5 Compass – so I can navigate my way around the island and find my way back to base! 6 Food rations for 7 days – my plan would be to try and supplement this so they would last longer but who knows what’s on the island?  7 the sleeping bags – this was a toss up with the changes of clothes but I decided if I had the sleeping bags I could dry clothes while I slept 8 Backpack – because it’s useful for foraging or carrying things over distance but it was nearly the rope! 9 FAK – because it makes sense 10 Liferaft – Liferafts are designed  to be easily seen, they should also contain additional rations, water, first aid and flares 😉 maybe this one’s are strewn over the beach but maybe they aren’t! In my mind this is shelter, supplies and an SOS flag all in one! In reality though I would probably empty the backpack (if it had stuff in it) put as many useful items as possible in it and grab a tent in each hand and get up above the high water line. I’d probably use the long rope to tie up the liferaft so it didn’t float away, then make shuttle runs above the HWL with as much of the rest as possible! The last things I’d try and move would be the oxygen tanks and radio receiver. Not sure the receiver has a power source and while I’m sure Hollywood would have you connect it the 2 way radio to summon help that’s not in my skill set! I also don’t hold with the ‘not knowing where you are’, unless you’re not interested in where you travel! You’d know where you departed from, how many days you’ve been afloat and what direction you were going.Yes you’re off course but If you left Gran Canaria 2 days ago you aren’t going to be in Indonesia. You may not know EXACTLY where you are but you’ll have a rough idea and the aerial maps may help if you the island has any distinguishing features although whether that is a help or comfort is probably debatable! 


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I agree mostly with what Pops says. I keep a first aid kit with dressings but my medicine cabinet contains the following – this is everyday use rather than end of the world supplies! Paracetamol (acetaminophen) I keep lots of this as it can be used for fever and pain. Ibuprofen to take down swelling. It’s not suitable for everyone though  I keep Chlorphenamine, an antihistamine, we don’t really have allergies in my family but this can be used to quickly treat allergic reactions. However it can make you sleepy so you need to be aware of that! I agree with Pops that cold medicines are not worth bothering with but I do keep menthol crystals with can be dissolved in hot water for steam inhalation. This is great to help with congestion but steam alone will also help. It can help when you get to the productive cough stage of a cold as well – for me this is much more cost effective than buying anti-mucolytics. Magnesium Sulphate paste which is used as a drawing ointment. A small packet of Imodium but plenty of rehydration sachets. I know you can make your own rehydration solution but tbh when I’m sick or I’m dealing with other people being sick a commercial product is easier to use. In my mind, diarrhoea is similar to coughing, the body’s way of trying to get rid of bad things but in case of upset stomachs I tend to resort to the BRAT diet!  Antibiotic resistance is something that worries me and access to antibiotic creams here tends to be prescription only so I don’t keep them although I have been known to keep the tubes if they’ve been prescribed and not completely finished! I do keep anti-septics and sudocrem. Other than that I keep sterile saline pods for eye and wound washing, tick removers,  I don’t keep low dose aspirin but perhaps I should as I’m now heading into that age category! Skincare is also really important, healthy skin will heal much quicker than dry skin. It is also less prone to damaged in the first place – So time to get moisturising!!  I’m a great believer that keeping active, especially outside, limiting processed foods and keeping healthy are the best ways to avoid problems but that’s just my opinion. 

I had considered the pots and pans and again it’s a situation thing; I could use the pans to collect rain water during the storm and possibly for cooking but I have food for 7 days and 10 days of potable water if I’m not rescued by then I may regret not having the pans😅but necessity is the mother of invention!  The rope could be improvised with the right vegetation. I’ve made nettle rope before at a living history museum. Equally I could probably improvise a bag but I’m thinking I may be hiking through difficult territory and a decent backpack is going to reduce strain! But maybe it’s not an osprey 60 – maybe is rainbow shimmer fashion backpack used to carry someone’s chihuahua for instagram purposes 😱 (in which case I’m taking the pans😂) I will be keeping the compass though! Yes the sun rises in the east and sets in the west but how dense is the vegetation? How about when the sky is overcast? Or you get caught in the half light?  I generally have a good sense of direction but I’m not prepared to rely on it in this situation. I know how easy it is to become disoriented if you’re hungry or dehydrated so the compass stays!  If natural navigation interests you, Eric, you may enjoy Tristan Goodley’s books.  I’m not sure the maps are going to be much help unless you’re close enough to make a successful crossing to safety. Given that my only transport option is a liferaft with a sail, I’m going to be at the mercy of both wind and current and my presumably much better equipped boat/ship failed I’m not sure if I’m risking that?  They may be able to tell you which direction help is likely to come from? The only other reason I would keep the maps would be to use the paper for drawing my own resources map of the island! 

Here’s my list: 1 Tents – there’s a storm coming so I want shelter and I probably don’t have time to build one from scratch! 2 Matches – I need some way to keep warm, boil water and cook any wild food I find. 3 Knife – I’m hoping this is a decent bush craft knife that I can use for multiple purposes and not just from the silverware drawer😉 4 Water – while I know water is essential I’m on the fence a little with this as it would depend on the circumstances of the time. Is this a single 10 gallon container in which case, how am I going to move it? Do I need to move it? Is it far enough up the beach that it may survive the storm? Is it obvious there is a fresh water source nearby?  5 Compass – so I can navigate my way around the island and find my way back to base! 6 Food rations for 7 days – my plan would be to try and supplement this so they would last longer but who knows what’s on the island?  7 the sleeping bags – this was a toss up with the changes of clothes but I decided if I had the sleeping bags I could dry clothes while I slept 8 Backpack – because it’s useful for foraging or carrying things over distance but it was nearly the rope! 9 FAK – because it makes sense 10 Liferaft – Liferafts are designed  to be easily seen, they should also contain additional rations, water, first aid and flares 😉 maybe this one’s are strewn over the beach but maybe they aren’t! In my mind this is shelter, supplies and an SOS flag all in one! In reality though I would probably empty the backpack (if it had stuff in it) put as many useful items as possible in it and grab a tent in each hand and get up above the high water line. I’d probably use the long rope to tie up the liferaft so it didn’t float away, then make shuttle runs above the HWL with as much of the rest as possible! The last things I’d try and move would be the oxygen tanks and radio receiver. Not sure the receiver has a power source and while I’m sure Hollywood would have you connect it the 2 way radio to summon help that’s not in my skill set! I also don’t hold with the ‘not knowing where you are’, unless you’re not interested in where you travel! You’d know where you departed from, how many days you’ve been afloat and what direction you were going.Yes you’re off course but If you left Gran Canaria 2 days ago you aren’t going to be in Indonesia. You may not know EXACTLY where you are but you’ll have a rough idea and the aerial maps may help if you the island has any distinguishing features although whether that is a help or comfort is probably debatable! 


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