Discussions

I live in SoCal and my preps reflect that.  Our concerns are earthquake, fire and civil unrest.   in the before time I had what I thought was a sufficient stockpile of P100 and Full face respirator masks because of fire and a child with severe asthma.  After a year of covid and having to rotate my masks I now know I need more.   my preps for home center around being able to endure a month or so with no power and high temps (lots of water and freeze dried food) and my go bag is centered around having to walk long distances with collapsed freeways to get home (robust shelter from sun, lightweight, moisture wicking, layered clothes, good shoes and hat, plenty of sunscreen).  However, we also travel to numerous countries that aren’t as developed as the US and there I pivot to carry more incest repellant, more water filtration, and more first aid (I will poach from home preps to bring extra abx and things like pred), especially since we are divers.   I have tried to achieve a certain synergy between my bag, my husband’s bag, and my child’s bag so if we are out together we can cover a wide range of scenarios.  I carry a collapsible titanium stove you can burn wood in while my husband carries a jet boil.  I carry an more extensive amount of medications whilst my husband has the more beefy trauma kit and my son carries the lions share of “boo boo” items.  I carry the gravity water filter while my husband has a sawyer mini with a backup filter and bag and my son has the aqua tabs.  All of us carry a life straw bottle.  My child is with or close to me 100% of the time so there’s less overlap there.  one thing Ive learned is critical is sleep so everyone has their own sleeping pad, sleep mask, blanket (we don’t live in a cold climate so this can be a very beefy emergency blanket/tarp that doubles as a footprint)and earplugs. I have a big Agnes tent I split between myself and my son when we travel alone.  I also carry melatonin.   we also try to vary the tools we carry.  We both have a knife and multi tool but I carry a handsaw and he carries an axe, he also carries the shovel.  He carries more stuff to repair the tent while I carry more zip ties.  His flashlight is more robust while I have the bigger and better radio.  We do travel to extremely cold climates once per year and my preps are different there.  I need more practice with that for sure. 

My husband is definitely annoyed with my prepping even though he’s a bit of a prepper himself, with two major differences: I was raising the alarm with everyone I knew about covid a full month before it was on anyone’s radar (in the US) as a threat. our son has an autoimmune disorder that would make catching covid very very bad.   because I was right about covid and got dismissed (I still get about 1-2 text messages per week of people slowly coming to terms with this virus saying “I thought you were crazy”, “we made fun of you”, “I didn’t believe you when you said this would last for years”) and because I am on top of developments, my husband has sort of let me lead our approach wrt covid. Prior to this he was extremely annoyed with me stockpiling freeze dried food.   because our son has an autoimmune disorder that specifically affects his respiratory system and He has a great specialist, i stockpiled about six months of his prescription respiratory meds in mid February. This caused much grumping from my husband about having to pay out of pocket.   As you can probably guess, these are medicines that are not available now and have been in and out of supply for nearly a year.  I have been able to keep my stockpile at about three months.   The rest of my family is so anti masking they gather on purpose just to prove a point.  With your husband, you won’t change his mind immediately , but if you keep exposing him to information about covid (it is now thought to cause male infertility) maybe he can be swayed.  Bringing up information in a non accusatory or smug way can help people who are in denial. Best of luck!  

I live in SoCal and my preps reflect that.  Our concerns are earthquake, fire and civil unrest.   in the before time I had what I thought was a sufficient stockpile of P100 and Full face respirator masks because of fire and a child with severe asthma.  After a year of covid and having to rotate my masks I now know I need more.   my preps for home center around being able to endure a month or so with no power and high temps (lots of water and freeze dried food) and my go bag is centered around having to walk long distances with collapsed freeways to get home (robust shelter from sun, lightweight, moisture wicking, layered clothes, good shoes and hat, plenty of sunscreen).  However, we also travel to numerous countries that aren’t as developed as the US and there I pivot to carry more incest repellant, more water filtration, and more first aid (I will poach from home preps to bring extra abx and things like pred), especially since we are divers.   I have tried to achieve a certain synergy between my bag, my husband’s bag, and my child’s bag so if we are out together we can cover a wide range of scenarios.  I carry a collapsible titanium stove you can burn wood in while my husband carries a jet boil.  I carry an more extensive amount of medications whilst my husband has the more beefy trauma kit and my son carries the lions share of “boo boo” items.  I carry the gravity water filter while my husband has a sawyer mini with a backup filter and bag and my son has the aqua tabs.  All of us carry a life straw bottle.  My child is with or close to me 100% of the time so there’s less overlap there.  one thing Ive learned is critical is sleep so everyone has their own sleeping pad, sleep mask, blanket (we don’t live in a cold climate so this can be a very beefy emergency blanket/tarp that doubles as a footprint)and earplugs. I have a big Agnes tent I split between myself and my son when we travel alone.  I also carry melatonin.   we also try to vary the tools we carry.  We both have a knife and multi tool but I carry a handsaw and he carries an axe, he also carries the shovel.  He carries more stuff to repair the tent while I carry more zip ties.  His flashlight is more robust while I have the bigger and better radio.  We do travel to extremely cold climates once per year and my preps are different there.  I need more practice with that for sure. 

My husband is definitely annoyed with my prepping even though he’s a bit of a prepper himself, with two major differences: I was raising the alarm with everyone I knew about covid a full month before it was on anyone’s radar (in the US) as a threat. our son has an autoimmune disorder that would make catching covid very very bad.   because I was right about covid and got dismissed (I still get about 1-2 text messages per week of people slowly coming to terms with this virus saying “I thought you were crazy”, “we made fun of you”, “I didn’t believe you when you said this would last for years”) and because I am on top of developments, my husband has sort of let me lead our approach wrt covid. Prior to this he was extremely annoyed with me stockpiling freeze dried food.   because our son has an autoimmune disorder that specifically affects his respiratory system and He has a great specialist, i stockpiled about six months of his prescription respiratory meds in mid February. This caused much grumping from my husband about having to pay out of pocket.   As you can probably guess, these are medicines that are not available now and have been in and out of supply for nearly a year.  I have been able to keep my stockpile at about three months.   The rest of my family is so anti masking they gather on purpose just to prove a point.  With your husband, you won’t change his mind immediately , but if you keep exposing him to information about covid (it is now thought to cause male infertility) maybe he can be swayed.  Bringing up information in a non accusatory or smug way can help people who are in denial. Best of luck!