Discussions

This is a good review. I bought the Point One Sawyer bucket system which costs $99 because the Point Zero Two wasn’t available. It’s now selling on Amazon for $139 but I’m not sure I’ll get it. The .02 will eliminate “most” viruses, but I use Chlorine Dioxide when I feel nervous about viruses. Viruses, I’m told, are rarely found in water sources in the USA. Of course, after SHTF, that might be different. Covid-19, I’m told, is a fat virus that can be filtered out with 0.5 filtration. (But actually that doesn’t matter because Covid-19 is not water bourne.) The reviewer appears to have had some difficulty installing the system. I’m not good with tools but I had no problem installing my mine, but I used a drill right from the start. There were no leaks and it took me just ten minutes. The reviewer says it would be nice to have charcoal filtration. I’ve used charcoal filters before and they improve the taste and the appearance of the water but my main concern has been bacteria. You can add an inline charcoal filter to this system if you like. Platypus sells one for $19. But here’s the problem: they don’t last very long unless your water is very clean to begin with. Would upgrading to the Point Zero Two be the smart thing to do? I don’t want to worry about the expiration date of my Chlorine Dioxide tablets. But how likely will viruses be a concern after SHTF? One man’s paranoia is another man’s smart preparation. When I’m in a level-headed mood, I think that 0.02 is overkill and that it’s highly unlikely that viruses will be a problem after SHTF. After a natural disaster, the most likely problem with water will be contamination from sewage. To purify it, all you’d need is the 0.1. And the 0.1 will purify the water a lot faster than the 0.02. A couple of days ago I asked Customer Service at Sawyer about the 0.02 system. This is what they said: “Our SP191 system is temporarily discontinued. It is used mostly with our international partners in countries and communities where water borne viruses are still an issue. They have been eliminated in the United States.” And in another email: “The SP191 is temporarily discontinued as we work with outfitting our international partners with our inventory. They were designed specifically for those communities and they are being prioritized for them at this point. In regards SP191 we do not have certified dealers selling the 0.02 micron system at this time.” So that means that Amazon is not a certified dealer. Naturally, I want my water to be as pure as possible, but after applying facts and reason, it looks like the 0.1 bucket system is the way to go. By the way, it’s also smart to have on hand several propane tanks to purify water by boiling it. I purchased a heavy duty two burner propane stove specifically for that purpose.

The most common backpack HF unit is the Yaesu FT817nd because it’s decent and been around the longest. It puts out 5 watts. Elecraft has the KX2 and the KX3 which are newer and superior in design. They put out around 10 watts. There are a couple of radios coming out from China, the Xiegu, one that puts out 5 watts another another one that puts out 20. The best of the bunch in terms of quality, expandability, and ease of operation would be the KX3. It’s also the most expensive. There are small mobile radios like the Yaesu FT891 that will fit in a backpack and run 100 watts but need a power source like a car battery or a 100 ah battery connected to a full size solar panel. Conditions will allow 5 watt radios to work sometimes. You’ve got to be fairly lucky. Twenty watt radios will work a lot more often, and a 100 watt radio works even better. But even with a 100 watt radio, you are subject to daily band conditions and the time of day. A portable HF radio set up makes communication possible, but not reliable. Even a good HF base station isn’t always reliable. Radios that put out 5 to 10 watts are challenging to operate which make it an interesting hobby, but not very good for a preparation plan. A small size 100 watt HF rig, preferably with a built in antenna tuner, would be the best way to go unless you know you won’t have any way to power it. My HF base station runs off a battery and a solar panel. I also have portable HF  5 and 20 watt radios and a 75 watt 2 meter radio  To supplement emergency ham radio communication, I have a Garmin inReach Mini satellite device for two-way email. It costs me $12/month but it’s very reliable and enables communication with anybody worldwide.

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This is a good review. I bought the Point One Sawyer bucket system which costs $99 because the Point Zero Two wasn’t available. It’s now selling on Amazon for $139 but I’m not sure I’ll get it. The .02 will eliminate “most” viruses, but I use Chlorine Dioxide when I feel nervous about viruses. Viruses, I’m told, are rarely found in water sources in the USA. Of course, after SHTF, that might be different. Covid-19, I’m told, is a fat virus that can be filtered out with 0.5 filtration. (But actually that doesn’t matter because Covid-19 is not water bourne.) The reviewer appears to have had some difficulty installing the system. I’m not good with tools but I had no problem installing my mine, but I used a drill right from the start. There were no leaks and it took me just ten minutes. The reviewer says it would be nice to have charcoal filtration. I’ve used charcoal filters before and they improve the taste and the appearance of the water but my main concern has been bacteria. You can add an inline charcoal filter to this system if you like. Platypus sells one for $19. But here’s the problem: they don’t last very long unless your water is very clean to begin with. Would upgrading to the Point Zero Two be the smart thing to do? I don’t want to worry about the expiration date of my Chlorine Dioxide tablets. But how likely will viruses be a concern after SHTF? One man’s paranoia is another man’s smart preparation. When I’m in a level-headed mood, I think that 0.02 is overkill and that it’s highly unlikely that viruses will be a problem after SHTF. After a natural disaster, the most likely problem with water will be contamination from sewage. To purify it, all you’d need is the 0.1. And the 0.1 will purify the water a lot faster than the 0.02. A couple of days ago I asked Customer Service at Sawyer about the 0.02 system. This is what they said: “Our SP191 system is temporarily discontinued. It is used mostly with our international partners in countries and communities where water borne viruses are still an issue. They have been eliminated in the United States.” And in another email: “The SP191 is temporarily discontinued as we work with outfitting our international partners with our inventory. They were designed specifically for those communities and they are being prioritized for them at this point. In regards SP191 we do not have certified dealers selling the 0.02 micron system at this time.” So that means that Amazon is not a certified dealer. Naturally, I want my water to be as pure as possible, but after applying facts and reason, it looks like the 0.1 bucket system is the way to go. By the way, it’s also smart to have on hand several propane tanks to purify water by boiling it. I purchased a heavy duty two burner propane stove specifically for that purpose.

The most common backpack HF unit is the Yaesu FT817nd because it’s decent and been around the longest. It puts out 5 watts. Elecraft has the KX2 and the KX3 which are newer and superior in design. They put out around 10 watts. There are a couple of radios coming out from China, the Xiegu, one that puts out 5 watts another another one that puts out 20. The best of the bunch in terms of quality, expandability, and ease of operation would be the KX3. It’s also the most expensive. There are small mobile radios like the Yaesu FT891 that will fit in a backpack and run 100 watts but need a power source like a car battery or a 100 ah battery connected to a full size solar panel. Conditions will allow 5 watt radios to work sometimes. You’ve got to be fairly lucky. Twenty watt radios will work a lot more often, and a 100 watt radio works even better. But even with a 100 watt radio, you are subject to daily band conditions and the time of day. A portable HF radio set up makes communication possible, but not reliable. Even a good HF base station isn’t always reliable. Radios that put out 5 to 10 watts are challenging to operate which make it an interesting hobby, but not very good for a preparation plan. A small size 100 watt HF rig, preferably with a built in antenna tuner, would be the best way to go unless you know you won’t have any way to power it. My HF base station runs off a battery and a solar panel. I also have portable HF  5 and 20 watt radios and a 75 watt 2 meter radio  To supplement emergency ham radio communication, I have a Garmin inReach Mini satellite device for two-way email. It costs me $12/month but it’s very reliable and enables communication with anybody worldwide.