Discussions

Hi!  I can’t tell you specifics w/o knowing your kit makeup; and, this is only my opinion based not on making a BOB but rather backcountry hiking.  All the things you’ve done so far sound like the right strategy.  My thoughts are probably fairly obvious, recognizing that you’ll have to make choices. 1) reduce redundancies. following this site’s kit list, do you need water filter and purifiers? Do you need plastic garbage bags?  Is a radio critical or can you make do with your phone?    The weight of H2O pills seems minimal, but ounces add up.  I know people who would remove the zipper pulls from their bags to reduce weight just a little more.  There are plenty of items on the list that are “nice to have” depending on what type of situation you think you’ll face.  Obviously, look at heavier items first. 2) prioritize.  I used to hike with a paperback book b/c I liked to read after making camp.  If I thought I wasn’t going to have time to do that, I’d obviously leave the book.  Or, I could tear it down to chapters, or keep it digitally on my phone now! Some other thoughts…  27 lbs is a really good weight, I’d be really happy with that.  25 years ago, I’d carry 50+ lbs and be able to make 15 miles in a day.  That’s not my range anymore.  at this stage of my life, circumstances are such that I don’t imagine I’d be going anywhere quickly.  But, my assessment is that I can’t even think of anything that would force us to leave in a hurry.  So, I emphasize having a few more things knowing we’ll be going slow anyway. Lastly, I purchased a small woodburning camp stove so we could practice cooking in the backyard (though, we mostly just make s’mores).  It’s decent.  The benefit of packing this is not having to carry fuel.

Hobby farm or homestead?
13
16

Thank you both for curating some highlights/lowlights.  I appreciate the un-editorial coverage — it’s important to make decisions based on facts, intelligence, etc. On the protests, I’ll withhold judgement of the assessment.  Seems like the “popularity” of these may be over-emphasized.  Would be interesting to follow-up with participants in 2 weeks. Not withholding judgement on the protesters in this regard… most people like freedom, most don’t want to be cooped up, etc.    But participating in society does require some… agreement to participate.  It’s odd that some of the folks arguing for “herd immunity” are the same that would go *against* the herd and endanger it.   Poor analogy coming in 3, 2, 1… imagine the herd heading for a cliff, 80% turn away and 20% tumble over.  The herd survives.  But then, a small percentage of the herd (2%? 5% 10%?) decide they want to head back TOWARDS the cliff and bring you with them.  WTF?  I suppose it depends on whether you “believe” there’s a cliff? Anyway, lawyers are often accused of being too willing to help their clients evade laws while not technically breaking them; effectively aiding their clients to “not participate” in society for no other reason than personal monetary gain.  There are people in truly compromised situations with regard to finances, work, etc.  We should absolutely help them and work to re-open safely.  But, to open (without a plan!) for a haircut and some ice cream seems dumb.   QUICK EDIT: It seems the data/intelligence suggests that any safe re-opening requires testing, tracking, etc. If so, then people probably need convincing that that can/will happen.

The non-fiction side is obviously helpful in a definitive, objective way.  If I may offer some editorial about the *fiction* side… I like the post-apocalyptic genre in large part b/c it’s interesting to read about/imagine how humans respond to the various crises.  Some are overtly sci-fi in nature, others supernatural.  Those can be fun, but not particularly instructive.  Regardless, the scenarios described in any of these stories illustrate various societal/human responses with a lot of variance on the path chosen vs. outcome. One Second After is… interesting for it’s description of the societal response, and it’s tempting to be drawn into that world.  But, as others have noted, the book is otherwise trash.  Poorly written and entirely derivative of Alas, Babylon.  Plus, this site continuously cautions against (mocks?) the “Rambo Syndrome”… I would say that One Second After is guilty of the promoting the “Patton Syndrome”. If Rambo is the ultimate lone warrior, the Protagonist in OSA is, naturally, a veritable God with regard to leadership and command (something the author fawns over ever 3rd page).  In fairness, the fault of OSA lies more in the endless virtue of every character miraculously within the Protagonist’s universe. Alas, Babylon treads similar ground, with some of the same flaws.  But it does a much better job of conveying the aftermath without so much jingoistic nonsense. Station Eleven also has a very good opening section, which covers the initial days of a pandemic quickly spreading across the globe.


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Hobby farm or homestead?
13
16

Hi!  I can’t tell you specifics w/o knowing your kit makeup; and, this is only my opinion based not on making a BOB but rather backcountry hiking.  All the things you’ve done so far sound like the right strategy.  My thoughts are probably fairly obvious, recognizing that you’ll have to make choices. 1) reduce redundancies. following this site’s kit list, do you need water filter and purifiers? Do you need plastic garbage bags?  Is a radio critical or can you make do with your phone?    The weight of H2O pills seems minimal, but ounces add up.  I know people who would remove the zipper pulls from their bags to reduce weight just a little more.  There are plenty of items on the list that are “nice to have” depending on what type of situation you think you’ll face.  Obviously, look at heavier items first. 2) prioritize.  I used to hike with a paperback book b/c I liked to read after making camp.  If I thought I wasn’t going to have time to do that, I’d obviously leave the book.  Or, I could tear it down to chapters, or keep it digitally on my phone now! Some other thoughts…  27 lbs is a really good weight, I’d be really happy with that.  25 years ago, I’d carry 50+ lbs and be able to make 15 miles in a day.  That’s not my range anymore.  at this stage of my life, circumstances are such that I don’t imagine I’d be going anywhere quickly.  But, my assessment is that I can’t even think of anything that would force us to leave in a hurry.  So, I emphasize having a few more things knowing we’ll be going slow anyway. Lastly, I purchased a small woodburning camp stove so we could practice cooking in the backyard (though, we mostly just make s’mores).  It’s decent.  The benefit of packing this is not having to carry fuel.

Thank you both for curating some highlights/lowlights.  I appreciate the un-editorial coverage — it’s important to make decisions based on facts, intelligence, etc. On the protests, I’ll withhold judgement of the assessment.  Seems like the “popularity” of these may be over-emphasized.  Would be interesting to follow-up with participants in 2 weeks. Not withholding judgement on the protesters in this regard… most people like freedom, most don’t want to be cooped up, etc.    But participating in society does require some… agreement to participate.  It’s odd that some of the folks arguing for “herd immunity” are the same that would go *against* the herd and endanger it.   Poor analogy coming in 3, 2, 1… imagine the herd heading for a cliff, 80% turn away and 20% tumble over.  The herd survives.  But then, a small percentage of the herd (2%? 5% 10%?) decide they want to head back TOWARDS the cliff and bring you with them.  WTF?  I suppose it depends on whether you “believe” there’s a cliff? Anyway, lawyers are often accused of being too willing to help their clients evade laws while not technically breaking them; effectively aiding their clients to “not participate” in society for no other reason than personal monetary gain.  There are people in truly compromised situations with regard to finances, work, etc.  We should absolutely help them and work to re-open safely.  But, to open (without a plan!) for a haircut and some ice cream seems dumb.   QUICK EDIT: It seems the data/intelligence suggests that any safe re-opening requires testing, tracking, etc. If so, then people probably need convincing that that can/will happen.

The non-fiction side is obviously helpful in a definitive, objective way.  If I may offer some editorial about the *fiction* side… I like the post-apocalyptic genre in large part b/c it’s interesting to read about/imagine how humans respond to the various crises.  Some are overtly sci-fi in nature, others supernatural.  Those can be fun, but not particularly instructive.  Regardless, the scenarios described in any of these stories illustrate various societal/human responses with a lot of variance on the path chosen vs. outcome. One Second After is… interesting for it’s description of the societal response, and it’s tempting to be drawn into that world.  But, as others have noted, the book is otherwise trash.  Poorly written and entirely derivative of Alas, Babylon.  Plus, this site continuously cautions against (mocks?) the “Rambo Syndrome”… I would say that One Second After is guilty of the promoting the “Patton Syndrome”. If Rambo is the ultimate lone warrior, the Protagonist in OSA is, naturally, a veritable God with regard to leadership and command (something the author fawns over ever 3rd page).  In fairness, the fault of OSA lies more in the endless virtue of every character miraculously within the Protagonist’s universe. Alas, Babylon treads similar ground, with some of the same flaws.  But it does a much better job of conveying the aftermath without so much jingoistic nonsense. Station Eleven also has a very good opening section, which covers the initial days of a pandemic quickly spreading across the globe.


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