Discussions

The point about closing borders not helping with diseases is prob true in a lot of/most situations. It just sounds strange to an Australian during COVID-19. I think it just needs a lot of caveats. Like, it obvs helps if borders are surrounded by water. And there are humanitarian issues, like citizens trying to return home. It should be considered a matter of when, not if, cases will escape quarantine. So distancing & testing & tracing still needed. And quarantine needs to be continually refined. Would all this have helped with a different disease? Maybe not, but here we are. In a context where external (sea) borders are mostly closed, internal border closures have also helped. Though, there needed to be cooperation with state authorities on either side & with the majority of public. My main reason for saying they helped is Australia’s second wave was largely contained to the state of Victoria. Of Aust’s 910 fatalities, 820 occurred in Vic. There have been multiple temporary closures between states/territories since. I didn’t see my fam in the ACT until a month after Xmas due to a small cluster in NSW. Of course the nation being a continent is a big factor. And the type of disease. I reeeally don’t want to suggest that our closures can be directly transposed to the situation of whoever is reading this. The whole process is complicated and extremely situational (geographically, financially, socially). But I agree that border closures don’t keep cases out entirely. Whether they “help” depends on a whole bunch of things. Maybe the rule is: don’t *count* on border closures helping when it comes to the next pandemic.

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The point about closing borders not helping with diseases is prob true in a lot of/most situations. It just sounds strange to an Australian during COVID-19. I think it just needs a lot of caveats. Like, it obvs helps if borders are surrounded by water. And there are humanitarian issues, like citizens trying to return home. It should be considered a matter of when, not if, cases will escape quarantine. So distancing & testing & tracing still needed. And quarantine needs to be continually refined. Would all this have helped with a different disease? Maybe not, but here we are. In a context where external (sea) borders are mostly closed, internal border closures have also helped. Though, there needed to be cooperation with state authorities on either side & with the majority of public. My main reason for saying they helped is Australia’s second wave was largely contained to the state of Victoria. Of Aust’s 910 fatalities, 820 occurred in Vic. There have been multiple temporary closures between states/territories since. I didn’t see my fam in the ACT until a month after Xmas due to a small cluster in NSW. Of course the nation being a continent is a big factor. And the type of disease. I reeeally don’t want to suggest that our closures can be directly transposed to the situation of whoever is reading this. The whole process is complicated and extremely situational (geographically, financially, socially). But I agree that border closures don’t keep cases out entirely. Whether they “help” depends on a whole bunch of things. Maybe the rule is: don’t *count* on border closures helping when it comes to the next pandemic.