Discussions

I just finished writing 8 pages of notes on what I’ve done, and I made it available to friends and acquaintances to encourage them to prepare. I encouraged folks to check out The Prepared and its Forum. The document topics were Background, Intention, Assumptions, Priorities (physical well being, emotional well being, water, food, shelter, communications, logistics), and Conclusion.  I replaced failing household items to avoid having to do it later when the situation might be worse — water heater, thermostats, bathroom water supply line, one of the electric baseboard heaters. I added a reverse osmosis water filter to feel better about the well water. I upgraded my vehicle to make it more functional if I had to leave — added side rails, crossbars, and a trailer hitch. I bought a bike rack and a soft-side cartop carrier. I bought camping gear and camped for a couple of weeks this summer, mostly nearby on private property, usually a day at a time. I wanted to see how well I could lug things around, set up, take down, handle the bugs. 🙂  I added a tool box to the vehicle (containing hammer, camp axe, nails, awl, small pry bar, wire snips, leather gloves). The bow saw doesn’t fit into the tool box. The tools are separate from first aid supplies. Regarding physical well being, I wrote, “I am not opposed in principle to other people using firearms to protect themselves. However, I do not choose that route for myself. I rely on situational awareness, avoidance of potentially harmful situations (even if that means avoiding worthwhile protests), reasonable precautions, such as locking condo and car doors, and basic self-defense techniques . . . If I find myself in trouble, I hope to call upon emotional intelligence and ‘soft skills’ to de-escalate the situation.” I really appreciate all The Prepared has done. Thank you!

More than one cell phone?
8
12

I’d agree you’re not being too pessimistic. As others have said, the U.S. was not in a good place before the pandemic. It’s orders of magnitude worse now. I also worry about national security. Hostile entities could take advantage of the weakened state of the U.S. Or a politician (aided by others inside and outside government) could start a war or conveniently fall into one. After all, didn’t the greatest period of economic prosperity occur while rebuilding after a major war? I’m NOT in favor of this approach, needless to say. Human beings should not be the means to the end of economic prosperity for the well positioned. “Under stress, people regress.” I heard that years ago. That’s another reason why you’re not too pessimistic. Even people who contributed to solutions more than to problems in the old days are likely to start contributing to problems in these days. What to do? I’m retired, which removes a lot of stress. I downsized when I retired, so I don’t have many belongings to worry about. My heart goes out to those who are working and/or raising children. To keep worry at bay and to keep productive, I’m trying to learn new skills or improve skills in a variety of realms, from computer matters to cooking to camping to things requiring manual dexterity. It’s never too late to learn how to tie a few knots. 😉 Learning something new has been a lifelong “go to” response since focus quiets my mind. I’m trying to strategize where to store additional preparedness things. A tiny upstairs condo doesn’t have much room. Besides trying to learn new skills, I try to see or create beauty in some small way each day. When my spirit crashes, beauty turns me around. Thank you, Jon and everyone, for your important work related to the importance of preparedness.  

More than one cell phone?
8
12

I just finished writing 8 pages of notes on what I’ve done, and I made it available to friends and acquaintances to encourage them to prepare. I encouraged folks to check out The Prepared and its Forum. The document topics were Background, Intention, Assumptions, Priorities (physical well being, emotional well being, water, food, shelter, communications, logistics), and Conclusion.  I replaced failing household items to avoid having to do it later when the situation might be worse — water heater, thermostats, bathroom water supply line, one of the electric baseboard heaters. I added a reverse osmosis water filter to feel better about the well water. I upgraded my vehicle to make it more functional if I had to leave — added side rails, crossbars, and a trailer hitch. I bought a bike rack and a soft-side cartop carrier. I bought camping gear and camped for a couple of weeks this summer, mostly nearby on private property, usually a day at a time. I wanted to see how well I could lug things around, set up, take down, handle the bugs. 🙂  I added a tool box to the vehicle (containing hammer, camp axe, nails, awl, small pry bar, wire snips, leather gloves). The bow saw doesn’t fit into the tool box. The tools are separate from first aid supplies. Regarding physical well being, I wrote, “I am not opposed in principle to other people using firearms to protect themselves. However, I do not choose that route for myself. I rely on situational awareness, avoidance of potentially harmful situations (even if that means avoiding worthwhile protests), reasonable precautions, such as locking condo and car doors, and basic self-defense techniques . . . If I find myself in trouble, I hope to call upon emotional intelligence and ‘soft skills’ to de-escalate the situation.” I really appreciate all The Prepared has done. Thank you!

I’d agree you’re not being too pessimistic. As others have said, the U.S. was not in a good place before the pandemic. It’s orders of magnitude worse now. I also worry about national security. Hostile entities could take advantage of the weakened state of the U.S. Or a politician (aided by others inside and outside government) could start a war or conveniently fall into one. After all, didn’t the greatest period of economic prosperity occur while rebuilding after a major war? I’m NOT in favor of this approach, needless to say. Human beings should not be the means to the end of economic prosperity for the well positioned. “Under stress, people regress.” I heard that years ago. That’s another reason why you’re not too pessimistic. Even people who contributed to solutions more than to problems in the old days are likely to start contributing to problems in these days. What to do? I’m retired, which removes a lot of stress. I downsized when I retired, so I don’t have many belongings to worry about. My heart goes out to those who are working and/or raising children. To keep worry at bay and to keep productive, I’m trying to learn new skills or improve skills in a variety of realms, from computer matters to cooking to camping to things requiring manual dexterity. It’s never too late to learn how to tie a few knots. 😉 Learning something new has been a lifelong “go to” response since focus quiets my mind. I’m trying to strategize where to store additional preparedness things. A tiny upstairs condo doesn’t have much room. Besides trying to learn new skills, I try to see or create beauty in some small way each day. When my spirit crashes, beauty turns me around. Thank you, Jon and everyone, for your important work related to the importance of preparedness.