Discussions

Ahhh ticks…they are my great nemesis April-October. We have hordes of them here. Just found the first one of the season on my sweater last night…no idea where it came from since I didn’t go anywhere near tick habitat yesterday. As far as their purpose goes, it appears their only ecological purpose is to be a disease vector. We get alot of Lyme around here, and anaplasmosis and babesiosis. But the really scary diagnoses are things like the rare Powassan virus which is often fatal. The odds of getting a tick borne illness increase the longer the tick is embedded on you. If you pull them off within a few minutes of a bite, chances of getting sick are very low. But if you are freaked out by ticks…do not google images of fully embedded ones! They bury their whole head and upper body in the skin. It’s absolutely revolting. That being said, ticks should not keep you from enjoying the outdoors. Long pants and calf high boots sprayed with bug repellent and thorough full body tick checks right after a hike will prevent the majority of bites. When we are in the woods with our kids, the first thing we do when we come home is to strip off our clothes and do a full tick check, toes to scalp (you must always check the whole body, as ticks climb up towards the head and face so you can easily find them in your hair). The clothes are thrown into the drier for 20 minutes on high to dessicate any ticks that might be stuck to the clothes. Turns out they are really dependent on high humidity for survival. It is a time consuming routine, but worth it. If you are hiking, you will need sharp tweezers and an antibiotic ointment if you need to remove them in the field. If you find an embedded tick that looks like it has been there for quite a few hours, you will often be prescribed antibiotics as a precaution.


Load more...
Chickens for preppers: Important considerations
10
18
Prepping strategies for larger families
6
17
Possible food/supply shortages…
49
22

Ahhh ticks…they are my great nemesis April-October. We have hordes of them here. Just found the first one of the season on my sweater last night…no idea where it came from since I didn’t go anywhere near tick habitat yesterday. As far as their purpose goes, it appears their only ecological purpose is to be a disease vector. We get alot of Lyme around here, and anaplasmosis and babesiosis. But the really scary diagnoses are things like the rare Powassan virus which is often fatal. The odds of getting a tick borne illness increase the longer the tick is embedded on you. If you pull them off within a few minutes of a bite, chances of getting sick are very low. But if you are freaked out by ticks…do not google images of fully embedded ones! They bury their whole head and upper body in the skin. It’s absolutely revolting. That being said, ticks should not keep you from enjoying the outdoors. Long pants and calf high boots sprayed with bug repellent and thorough full body tick checks right after a hike will prevent the majority of bites. When we are in the woods with our kids, the first thing we do when we come home is to strip off our clothes and do a full tick check, toes to scalp (you must always check the whole body, as ticks climb up towards the head and face so you can easily find them in your hair). The clothes are thrown into the drier for 20 minutes on high to dessicate any ticks that might be stuck to the clothes. Turns out they are really dependent on high humidity for survival. It is a time consuming routine, but worth it. If you are hiking, you will need sharp tweezers and an antibiotic ointment if you need to remove them in the field. If you find an embedded tick that looks like it has been there for quite a few hours, you will often be prescribed antibiotics as a precaution.


Load more...