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While I haven’t pulled the trigger on an off-grid cabin, last year my wife and I tried to buy one but ran into the same dilemma that you are going through and quickly were overwhelmed during the research phase. What makes a good plot of land for an off-grid habitation? How much snow does it get? What is the internet capabilities of that location? What are the rules of septic? etc… I wish that I could buy some land from someone who knows what they are doing, who has done all the boring and hard stuff like land surveying and installing utilities, and just let me move on knowing that I made a good decision. All that prep work and hassle is worth it. What we did was sit down and make a list of things that were important to us. How far away from the closest store and gas station did we want to be (commute time), we looked at cell phone provider maps and drove out to locations watching the reception we had on our phones, how much snow do they get every winter, is the land flat and have good soil that could be used for gardening, is there adequate sunlight for solar, and 190% we wanted to avoid an HOA. It was helpful to look up the local laws of X city and figure out if things like chickens or whatever were allowed and what regulations and permits were needed for various things. We called around to two or three contractors and asked pricing on things like septic and asked them what laws were in place for such things. They know best because they do that all day. Plan out roughly what everything would cost, septic, solar, the cabin itself, a well, and more and then add an additional 10% and make sure you can cover those prices.  If I started over again I would look into things like future climate change and avoid areas that will get too hot. You should be safe against that in Michigan for the next hundred years or so though. Best of luck to you both! Keep us updated with how things go and what you learn. You are asking for the advice today but can give it tomorrow.


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