Discussions

NYC teacher here with public private experience. Distance learning is completely different from in-class instruction, and not just because of the isolation/platforms. Unfortunately, it takes 6-12 months of serious effort and trial/error to transition traditional classroom program to online delivery, and most schools are not investing in the change (hoping to be back in the building, don’t blame them; hard to push burned-out distance learning teachers to work through summer). I teach upper elementary, and have two younger kids at home. My youngest didn’t engage at all with the program, and I didn’t push it. My oldest–still elementary–was more interested, but I erred on the side of playing in the park, digging in the dirt and collecting wildflowers. The way most schools are approaching distance learning–trying to replicate in-class teaching through live online sessions–is actually worst practices, but it’s the easiest, simplest move. That’s why the younger a kid gets, the less-effective it is, primarily because they’ve yet to acquire the student skills of ‘sit there and listen’ that older kids possess. Social-emotional wellness is my primary concern in all this, but not so much socialization. Only children is obviously a different situation, and I know many parents near me with one kid who’ve had a rough time. If your kid is into it, face timing with friends can be fun. Global Online Academy is an excellent online high school, and also a fantastic resource for online learning practice. It’s geared towards educators, so a lot of it can be jargony/technical. However, it definitely sets the standard and it’s professional development is highly sought-after. One Schoolhouse is another good resource, again for educators but also offering high school courses. For parents of elementary/preschool kids worried about their kids falling behind, I recommend the following: let them explore their world as much as you are comfortable, constantly ask them “I wonder why that is?” and help them find answers to their questions. Read and listen to stories each day (getepic is a fantastic subscription site with a huge library of audio books and e-books). Make a piece of art each day. Build things, break things and get dirt under their fingernails. It’s really hard to be a parent, especially these days, so good luck to all.


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Preps of shame?
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NYC teacher here with public private experience. Distance learning is completely different from in-class instruction, and not just because of the isolation/platforms. Unfortunately, it takes 6-12 months of serious effort and trial/error to transition traditional classroom program to online delivery, and most schools are not investing in the change (hoping to be back in the building, don’t blame them; hard to push burned-out distance learning teachers to work through summer). I teach upper elementary, and have two younger kids at home. My youngest didn’t engage at all with the program, and I didn’t push it. My oldest–still elementary–was more interested, but I erred on the side of playing in the park, digging in the dirt and collecting wildflowers. The way most schools are approaching distance learning–trying to replicate in-class teaching through live online sessions–is actually worst practices, but it’s the easiest, simplest move. That’s why the younger a kid gets, the less-effective it is, primarily because they’ve yet to acquire the student skills of ‘sit there and listen’ that older kids possess. Social-emotional wellness is my primary concern in all this, but not so much socialization. Only children is obviously a different situation, and I know many parents near me with one kid who’ve had a rough time. If your kid is into it, face timing with friends can be fun. Global Online Academy is an excellent online high school, and also a fantastic resource for online learning practice. It’s geared towards educators, so a lot of it can be jargony/technical. However, it definitely sets the standard and it’s professional development is highly sought-after. One Schoolhouse is another good resource, again for educators but also offering high school courses. For parents of elementary/preschool kids worried about their kids falling behind, I recommend the following: let them explore their world as much as you are comfortable, constantly ask them “I wonder why that is?” and help them find answers to their questions. Read and listen to stories each day (getepic is a fantastic subscription site with a huge library of audio books and e-books). Make a piece of art each day. Build things, break things and get dirt under their fingernails. It’s really hard to be a parent, especially these days, so good luck to all.


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