Discussions
Cell Signal Boosters
1
8

What a great thread amidst all the bad news! Thanks for starting this, Jay 🙂 Single dad of two boys under 10 living in NYC (yeah yeah), and we spend every possible moment scaring locals in the park or playgrounds if we aren’t out of the city on weekends in the wilds of New York State. It can be done, but can’t be forced.  Especially for younger kids, try to let them have as much control/say in an outing as possible. We often head to the park with all our flintknapping kit (I’m a shitty knapper but trying I swear), but they’ll end up wanting to tromp off and build a lean-to or do some imaginative play while I’m destroying spalls. If I tried to force them to knap the whole time, they’d be annoyed. But giving them as much freedom as possible creates a positive experience, which creates incentive to come out again.  I’m also letting my boys try out different activities and skills without forcing them to commit to one. I don’t mind if we spend one weekend fishing and then don’t come back to it because next weekend they want to hunt rabbits with the trainer bow and after that they want to practice fire building. Again, letting them drive the experience so they have positive associations with outdoors activities is my primary goal. I want them asking me when we can go do ____, not the other way around.  Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain are great, classic wilderness stories that are great read alouds for kids.  There are some decent shows that garner their interest, such as Alaska: The Last Frontier (some really horrible hunting practices, heads up) and Primal Survivor (kinda hokey but a cool idea and gets them interested).  My kids are also little gear heads, so they love building their own kits and getting new tools. Now that they are super interested in bushcraft/etc, we can have the “once you can do _(skill)__, then you will get _(tool)_” conversations, which drives motivation/excitement. And whining, truth be told.  @Redneck, I agree that devices tend to sap the attention and make this kind of engagement harder. But as a teacher, I truly believe that the natural environment/wilderness provides the perfect level of stimulus for humans of any age and, given the chance through repeated positive experiences, any kid can learn to enjoy time outside. 


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Cell Signal Boosters
1
8
Preps of shame?
32
27

What a great thread amidst all the bad news! Thanks for starting this, Jay 🙂 Single dad of two boys under 10 living in NYC (yeah yeah), and we spend every possible moment scaring locals in the park or playgrounds if we aren’t out of the city on weekends in the wilds of New York State. It can be done, but can’t be forced.  Especially for younger kids, try to let them have as much control/say in an outing as possible. We often head to the park with all our flintknapping kit (I’m a shitty knapper but trying I swear), but they’ll end up wanting to tromp off and build a lean-to or do some imaginative play while I’m destroying spalls. If I tried to force them to knap the whole time, they’d be annoyed. But giving them as much freedom as possible creates a positive experience, which creates incentive to come out again.  I’m also letting my boys try out different activities and skills without forcing them to commit to one. I don’t mind if we spend one weekend fishing and then don’t come back to it because next weekend they want to hunt rabbits with the trainer bow and after that they want to practice fire building. Again, letting them drive the experience so they have positive associations with outdoors activities is my primary goal. I want them asking me when we can go do ____, not the other way around.  Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain are great, classic wilderness stories that are great read alouds for kids.  There are some decent shows that garner their interest, such as Alaska: The Last Frontier (some really horrible hunting practices, heads up) and Primal Survivor (kinda hokey but a cool idea and gets them interested).  My kids are also little gear heads, so they love building their own kits and getting new tools. Now that they are super interested in bushcraft/etc, we can have the “once you can do _(skill)__, then you will get _(tool)_” conversations, which drives motivation/excitement. And whining, truth be told.  @Redneck, I agree that devices tend to sap the attention and make this kind of engagement harder. But as a teacher, I truly believe that the natural environment/wilderness provides the perfect level of stimulus for humans of any age and, given the chance through repeated positive experiences, any kid can learn to enjoy time outside. 


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