Discussions

Really good points on this thread, involving HUGE consequences for all involved. Let me say up front that I have no military / law enforcement training, but I do carry concealed under permit in my home county. And I have no conclusive answers, just some thoughts. It is a different time and culture in this country than it was. When I was in high school, we were never concerned with this kind of thing occurring in our (then) small agricultural town because half the students in school had a rifle or shotgun locked down in their pickups / cars in the school parking lot so they could go dove or pheasant hunting before or after school. And we routinely shot squirrels as a squirrels tunneling holes in the side of dikes and irrigation canals could set off flooding that could quickly spread into being deadly for humans, and cost millions in crop / property losses. Moral of story, it was our miniature version of the “Mutually Assured Destruction” doctrine. Nobody was going to start anything because they knew that if they did, the odds were extremely small that they would make it off the campus alive. It seems to me that making the “Mutually Assured Destruction” principal work in favor of protecting the innocent is wise. As noted in earlier comments, Israel (among other countries) have already done so and it is effective. Another earlier comment I would echo is this. If you are competent with firearms and choose to take action to protect the innocent, be VERY good at thinking clearly under stress, and at staying aware of what is going on around you. I have read way too many “after event” reports from way too many countries about folks being taken out by “misdirected friendly fire” because someone did not drop their firearm fast enough, sometimes because they did not hear commands given them due to being exposed to muzzle blast with no hearing protection. I would encourage folks to think through (in advance) what they would do if confronted with an attack like this. Trying to think with your heartbeat at 130 and irregular is a really good way to end up dead. I do not consider myself highly trained by any means. But I have talked to dozens of military combat vets, law enforcement types, phycologists, etc. who all tell me the same thing. When a huge threat like this happens, we all think we will rise to the greatest level of our knowledge and abilities. But the fact is that when the huge threat happens, we will only rise to the level of our training. No matter how noble our motives and desires are, over-estimating our abilities will only result in more destruction. Think through what you would want to do in advance, and train for that. And in that line of thought, take time to sort out the truth from the lies that surround an event like this terrible shooting. A lot of what’s being portrayed as truth in this situation is total lies that would not survive examination by a high school level logic student. Be safe out there.

Good Evening Robert, Happy Soul here from “out in the boonies” Nevada, USA. We are kind of “on the edge” of civilization here, so our preparations are a mix of “town” and “country”. For us, it’s a cell phone and sat. phone both, and keeping everything to where we can go 10 days on our own with no outside support. The supply chain that keeps us going comes from as far away as Sacramento, CA. Las Vegas, NV. and Salt Lake City, UT. And that means our supplies are subject to 8,000 foot mountain pass snows, and the formidable heat and cold of crossing the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Carrying (and training with) sidearms is routine. It is not that far out in the desert from here that one finds animals that consider we humans to be edible. But then again, if you’re buzzing down the highway on the way home and find yourself in the middle of an Elk migration, and you really have to do is put the windows up to keep said Elk out of the groceries in back, and keep moving – slowly. LOTS of things are different from my early days of prepping in San Mateo, California: First, is water. Without no water, the winds, dry air, and high elevation up here will kill you in 72 hours easily. Planning and lots of back up plans on water are vital up here. we have Puravai bottles everywhere, as it can also be used for wound irrigation as it’s (basically) bacteria free. We also maintain the cars religiously. There are a few spots where you do NOT want to be stuck with a dead car. And all the cars are full of enough stuff to hold you for a week in hot or cold. Search crews can’t always launch instantly here because of weather. Weather is big up here. A high temperature of 90 degrees during the day and 15 to 20 degrees that night is not unheard of. The other biggie is snow in the winter. For us, it’s usually measured in inches rather than feet. But we had to learn LOTS about ice driving when we moved here. Setting aside potential threats from proximity to military targets, the biggest thing we prepare for here is fire. Just like the big forest wildfires of the three Pacific Coast states moving in the trees of the forest, we have fire move just as quickly through the scrub brush of our deserts. We don’t have all the trees, but fire is quite happy to move just as quickly through all the dead scrub and bushes (that are full of oils) that burn like mad. That and wind can make things very dangerous very quickly. Keep those Division of Forestry cameras bookmarked on your computer. And lastly, be ready to live without technology out here. ATM machines are not always very good at spitting up the cash you requested when it was 11 degrees last night. And be ready to pay cash for stuff as the phone company microwave that carries data to Los Angeles to verify your debit card does not always work so good when the microwave antennas are frozen under a four inch layer of ice 20 miles from nowhere. As usual though, the people are what makes it all worth it. we are blessed with SERIOULY GREAT neighbors and friends around us. Prepping is as much community with good people as it is about survival. Be safe out there.

Good Evening NewPrepper, I applaud you taking time to think through what your needs and priorities will be when the next big emergency event comes. Let me offer a perspective on your question of keeping your cell phone charged up. I spent 40 years working inside one of the “biggie” telephone companies, doing their network electronics, fiber optics, and microwave goodies. One caveat first. I retired a bit over three years ago, and in telecom, two-year-old information is “ancient”. Working the job however, gave me the chance to talk with hundreds of other telecom technicians all over the US and Canada. There are a few principles that apply nation wide.  Whatever comes up the next time the bananas hit the fan, you will be looking at either a “bug in” or a “bug out” scenario. I’m a great fan of the “bug in unless forced out” school of thought.  But either way, being able to communicate is HUGE to your morale, your ability to protect yourself and your loved ones, and being able to help yourself and those around you. In a “bug in” event, if the event is bad enough that is has knocked phone voice service off-line, virtually all phone companies prioritize bring cell service back on line first, before land lines. And, that may not take as long as you think. Even if cell phone antennas / buildings have been destroyed, cell service is routinely restored by rolling in trucks called COW’s (Cell on wheels), or COLT’s (Cell on light trucks). Once in place, they simply crank up (telescoping) antennas, spin up on board generators, run diagnostics, and start hauling cell traffic, usually in under an hour. And text messages will usually move even when voice traffic will not because of overloading. When you call 911, land lines will generally show the emergency dispatcher the street address you are calling from. when you call 911 from a cell phone, the emergency dispatcher will see a map showing where you cell phone is, but the accuracy of that location could be anywhere from within a meter to within 300 to 400 meters depending on the area you are in and whether or not all the cell towers around you are in service. Lots of areas have “smart 911” programs where you can voluntarily register your home address to be matched with your cell phone in emergency databases. If you do that, generally when you call 911, the emergency dispatcher will see both a map of where your cell phone is located, AND a graphic that shows the home address that you voluntarily registered. That can be a VERY good thing if you can’t talk because you’re choking on something and live in a large apartment building. In a “bug out” event, a charged cell phone can be “pinged” for its location by authorities. Emergency dispatchers, say, working a large wildfire, can simply take an electronic stylus to an electronic map of the fire on their screens, draw a circle around the fire area, and whatever distance they like outside the fire perimeter, say 10 miles, and punch a button. A few seconds later, every cell phone within 10 miles of the fire area gets a warning message to evacuate. And rescuers can find you WAY EASIER if your cell phone is on, as it is chirping its location to all cell towers within range of the phone. And that chirping is BIG to rescuers, because it also gives them a pretty decent estimate of how many locations in the fire area have people there. So, enough “information overload”. The point is simply that, for all the reasons above, I’m a big advocate of having a cell handy all the time, and of having (redundant) ways to keep the thing charged all the time. Panels, car chargers, wall outlet chargers, they’re all good. Heck, I just bought a lounge chair / recliner that has a USB jack on the side of the chair without even realizing it until they delivered the chair! Also, keep track of how old your cell phones battery is, and get it replaced before it gets so old it won’t hold a charge. You do NOT want a cell phone dying on you 20 minutes after you took it off the charger. Thanks for reading!

Good Evening, I’ve have no experience with coolers like the one you mention for water storage. But there are some options in the 1 gallon range. This site has some wonderful information on water storage. Simply put “water brick” in the search box on the upper right of the screen for information on 1 gallon stackable containers. You are wise to recognize the question of lifting ability in storing water. As with all things preparedness, space, money, and your energy level are all considerations. If you are not already aware of them, let me offer a couple of possibilities in the 1 gallon and under range. Blue Can water sells water in 12 ounce (I think) soft drink size cans that is good for YEARS without doing any rotating, and the cans will fit in lots of small storage places in your house and car. But cost is a factor. I’ve also had good luck with Puravai water, which sells water in 1 liter bottles and is also good for YEARS of shelf life. But again, cost is a factor. But if you factor in that these two sources come in their own containers, there is no need to buy your own containers, no need to buy bleach, etc. to clean containers regularly, and no need to carry around lots of water weight to maintain rotation, these two might be a good option for you. And there are folks on this forum with WAY MORE experience in these matters than I have. These are just the two sources I use. There are LOTS of options for water, containers, filters, reverse osmosis, etc. on the market. For our household, I use the two sources mentioned above for long term storage drinking water storage, and use rotated (reverse osmosis) water for cooking, cleaning, hand washing, etc. Our “rotated” water supplies are in 10 liter and 20 liter Scepter water jugs, also shown elsewhere on this site. But a 20 liter jug full of water is roughly 45 pounds. Let me encourage you also to consider the structural capabilities of your water storage area in making your plans for water storage. There are 55 gallon drums out there made specifically for water storage, which can be both filled and drained by hand pumps a bit at a time so you have no water lifting to do as you use the water. But if I remember correctly, water is 7 to 8 pounds per gallon. Not all homes have floors that are built to take 400 pounds dropped on them in a couple of square feet of floor space. Good Hunting!

Good Evening jgrif, Wanted to chime in on keeping drinkable water in the Scepter water jugs. The information already posted by Redneck and Olly Wright tracks exactly with what I’ve found to work with the Scepter jugs. Light and air are indeed the enemy when it comes to storage. I rotate both 10 liter and 20 liter Scepter jugs, and use Dawn as noted in the other posts here. As an added thought, your wife’s desire for some form of filtration might be something that can work to both her advantage and yours.  Because of really hard water where I live, we put in a fancy, (seven stage) reverse osmosis water unit at our home. The Scepter jugs stay in our garage, and get filled (via a Naglene pitcher) with water from the R.O. unit. Said R.O. units are expensive, but against what you may be paying for filters, (or filtered / bottled water), the R.O. unit may pay itself off over time, particularly if you do the yearly maintenance on the R.O. unit yourself. And R.O. water brings the risk of bad stuff growing in your stored water WAY down. I store R.O. water for 5 months in sealed Scepter jugs and have had no contamination issues in the five years I’ve been rotating. And the last 5 month old sample I had a lab check came back WAY cleaner than the stuff that comes out of our taps. And for you, the only time you have to lift that 20 liter (5 gallon) jug is to dump the old water and clean the jug. I dump that water on our yard trees because of our high desert environment. But it’s very drinkable at that point. I suspect also that your wife will be happier if you can do this as R.O. water tastes really good (at least to us). Let me encourage you also to consider buying at least one 10 liter (2-1/2 gallon) Scepter jug to use in “emergency” times when you are actually living off your stored water. A full five gallon jug is in the neighborhood of 40 to 45 pounds. That can be difficult to control and pour accurately, particularly if you are in the post 50th birthday crowd. Pouring half the contents of Scepter’s 20 liter jog into a 10 liter jug and then using that 10 liter jug to fill water bottles / glasses / pet water bowls, etc. without spilling any water is BUNCHES easier, at least for me. And keep in mind please that some states limit how many gallons of liquid you can move in your vehicle before you need a special class of drivers license to carry said liquid in your vehicle. A county sheriff friend of mine recently said he had issued a verbal warning to guy he pulled over because the guy had 150 gallons of (unsecured) water in containers in the back of his SUV. In a freeway speed crash, it would only take one of these full jugs to the back of your head to kill. The good news is there are racks manufactured specifically to secure the Scepter jugs available from two or three sources. Thanks for reading my two cents worth!

Good Evening Greg, Congratulations on your Ham ticket. I just did my first 10 year renewal of my ham ticket, and like Seasons4, I still have MUCH to learn! Some thoughts that might help. Keep checking on linked repeater nets. I’d also check the articles on this site about GMRS radio service. It may be a long shot in your area. but some places will have enough low power GMRS repeaters to possibly get through your mountains. If you do go that route, you’ll need a separate GMRS license (with a different call sign), but I don’t think there is any test to take. If your budget can handle such things, satellite phones are available for a flat yearly fee for the phone, and a flat fee per minute for talk time. And sat. service is TOTALLY independent of cell towers, yeah! There are also satellite based services that move text message traffic only that are cheaper than voice service. If you and your family go that route, make sure you can live with satellite phone quirks. Sat. units work MUCH better outdoors, and some sat. networks use satellites that orbit just a few degrees above your ground level horizon, and the service is “line of sight”. So mountains can again be an issue if you are too close to them. And satellite based service can get really jammed really quickly if cell networks have an outage of more than 1 or 2 towers. In my area anyway, cell network failures are mercifully rare. Also, ALL sat. phone traffic is recorded for national security reasons. (Privacy issues?) One of the joys of ham radio is that its capabilities are growing quickly as technology progresses. And like all electronics, the cost of a unit with a given set of capabilities gets lower over time. Happy hunting!


Load more...
No activity yet.

Really good points on this thread, involving HUGE consequences for all involved. Let me say up front that I have no military / law enforcement training, but I do carry concealed under permit in my home county. And I have no conclusive answers, just some thoughts. It is a different time and culture in this country than it was. When I was in high school, we were never concerned with this kind of thing occurring in our (then) small agricultural town because half the students in school had a rifle or shotgun locked down in their pickups / cars in the school parking lot so they could go dove or pheasant hunting before or after school. And we routinely shot squirrels as a squirrels tunneling holes in the side of dikes and irrigation canals could set off flooding that could quickly spread into being deadly for humans, and cost millions in crop / property losses. Moral of story, it was our miniature version of the “Mutually Assured Destruction” doctrine. Nobody was going to start anything because they knew that if they did, the odds were extremely small that they would make it off the campus alive. It seems to me that making the “Mutually Assured Destruction” principal work in favor of protecting the innocent is wise. As noted in earlier comments, Israel (among other countries) have already done so and it is effective. Another earlier comment I would echo is this. If you are competent with firearms and choose to take action to protect the innocent, be VERY good at thinking clearly under stress, and at staying aware of what is going on around you. I have read way too many “after event” reports from way too many countries about folks being taken out by “misdirected friendly fire” because someone did not drop their firearm fast enough, sometimes because they did not hear commands given them due to being exposed to muzzle blast with no hearing protection. I would encourage folks to think through (in advance) what they would do if confronted with an attack like this. Trying to think with your heartbeat at 130 and irregular is a really good way to end up dead. I do not consider myself highly trained by any means. But I have talked to dozens of military combat vets, law enforcement types, phycologists, etc. who all tell me the same thing. When a huge threat like this happens, we all think we will rise to the greatest level of our knowledge and abilities. But the fact is that when the huge threat happens, we will only rise to the level of our training. No matter how noble our motives and desires are, over-estimating our abilities will only result in more destruction. Think through what you would want to do in advance, and train for that. And in that line of thought, take time to sort out the truth from the lies that surround an event like this terrible shooting. A lot of what’s being portrayed as truth in this situation is total lies that would not survive examination by a high school level logic student. Be safe out there.

Good Evening Robert, Happy Soul here from “out in the boonies” Nevada, USA. We are kind of “on the edge” of civilization here, so our preparations are a mix of “town” and “country”. For us, it’s a cell phone and sat. phone both, and keeping everything to where we can go 10 days on our own with no outside support. The supply chain that keeps us going comes from as far away as Sacramento, CA. Las Vegas, NV. and Salt Lake City, UT. And that means our supplies are subject to 8,000 foot mountain pass snows, and the formidable heat and cold of crossing the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Carrying (and training with) sidearms is routine. It is not that far out in the desert from here that one finds animals that consider we humans to be edible. But then again, if you’re buzzing down the highway on the way home and find yourself in the middle of an Elk migration, and you really have to do is put the windows up to keep said Elk out of the groceries in back, and keep moving – slowly. LOTS of things are different from my early days of prepping in San Mateo, California: First, is water. Without no water, the winds, dry air, and high elevation up here will kill you in 72 hours easily. Planning and lots of back up plans on water are vital up here. we have Puravai bottles everywhere, as it can also be used for wound irrigation as it’s (basically) bacteria free. We also maintain the cars religiously. There are a few spots where you do NOT want to be stuck with a dead car. And all the cars are full of enough stuff to hold you for a week in hot or cold. Search crews can’t always launch instantly here because of weather. Weather is big up here. A high temperature of 90 degrees during the day and 15 to 20 degrees that night is not unheard of. The other biggie is snow in the winter. For us, it’s usually measured in inches rather than feet. But we had to learn LOTS about ice driving when we moved here. Setting aside potential threats from proximity to military targets, the biggest thing we prepare for here is fire. Just like the big forest wildfires of the three Pacific Coast states moving in the trees of the forest, we have fire move just as quickly through the scrub brush of our deserts. We don’t have all the trees, but fire is quite happy to move just as quickly through all the dead scrub and bushes (that are full of oils) that burn like mad. That and wind can make things very dangerous very quickly. Keep those Division of Forestry cameras bookmarked on your computer. And lastly, be ready to live without technology out here. ATM machines are not always very good at spitting up the cash you requested when it was 11 degrees last night. And be ready to pay cash for stuff as the phone company microwave that carries data to Los Angeles to verify your debit card does not always work so good when the microwave antennas are frozen under a four inch layer of ice 20 miles from nowhere. As usual though, the people are what makes it all worth it. we are blessed with SERIOULY GREAT neighbors and friends around us. Prepping is as much community with good people as it is about survival. Be safe out there.

Good Evening NewPrepper, I applaud you taking time to think through what your needs and priorities will be when the next big emergency event comes. Let me offer a perspective on your question of keeping your cell phone charged up. I spent 40 years working inside one of the “biggie” telephone companies, doing their network electronics, fiber optics, and microwave goodies. One caveat first. I retired a bit over three years ago, and in telecom, two-year-old information is “ancient”. Working the job however, gave me the chance to talk with hundreds of other telecom technicians all over the US and Canada. There are a few principles that apply nation wide.  Whatever comes up the next time the bananas hit the fan, you will be looking at either a “bug in” or a “bug out” scenario. I’m a great fan of the “bug in unless forced out” school of thought.  But either way, being able to communicate is HUGE to your morale, your ability to protect yourself and your loved ones, and being able to help yourself and those around you. In a “bug in” event, if the event is bad enough that is has knocked phone voice service off-line, virtually all phone companies prioritize bring cell service back on line first, before land lines. And, that may not take as long as you think. Even if cell phone antennas / buildings have been destroyed, cell service is routinely restored by rolling in trucks called COW’s (Cell on wheels), or COLT’s (Cell on light trucks). Once in place, they simply crank up (telescoping) antennas, spin up on board generators, run diagnostics, and start hauling cell traffic, usually in under an hour. And text messages will usually move even when voice traffic will not because of overloading. When you call 911, land lines will generally show the emergency dispatcher the street address you are calling from. when you call 911 from a cell phone, the emergency dispatcher will see a map showing where you cell phone is, but the accuracy of that location could be anywhere from within a meter to within 300 to 400 meters depending on the area you are in and whether or not all the cell towers around you are in service. Lots of areas have “smart 911” programs where you can voluntarily register your home address to be matched with your cell phone in emergency databases. If you do that, generally when you call 911, the emergency dispatcher will see both a map of where your cell phone is located, AND a graphic that shows the home address that you voluntarily registered. That can be a VERY good thing if you can’t talk because you’re choking on something and live in a large apartment building. In a “bug out” event, a charged cell phone can be “pinged” for its location by authorities. Emergency dispatchers, say, working a large wildfire, can simply take an electronic stylus to an electronic map of the fire on their screens, draw a circle around the fire area, and whatever distance they like outside the fire perimeter, say 10 miles, and punch a button. A few seconds later, every cell phone within 10 miles of the fire area gets a warning message to evacuate. And rescuers can find you WAY EASIER if your cell phone is on, as it is chirping its location to all cell towers within range of the phone. And that chirping is BIG to rescuers, because it also gives them a pretty decent estimate of how many locations in the fire area have people there. So, enough “information overload”. The point is simply that, for all the reasons above, I’m a big advocate of having a cell handy all the time, and of having (redundant) ways to keep the thing charged all the time. Panels, car chargers, wall outlet chargers, they’re all good. Heck, I just bought a lounge chair / recliner that has a USB jack on the side of the chair without even realizing it until they delivered the chair! Also, keep track of how old your cell phones battery is, and get it replaced before it gets so old it won’t hold a charge. You do NOT want a cell phone dying on you 20 minutes after you took it off the charger. Thanks for reading!

Good Evening, I’ve have no experience with coolers like the one you mention for water storage. But there are some options in the 1 gallon range. This site has some wonderful information on water storage. Simply put “water brick” in the search box on the upper right of the screen for information on 1 gallon stackable containers. You are wise to recognize the question of lifting ability in storing water. As with all things preparedness, space, money, and your energy level are all considerations. If you are not already aware of them, let me offer a couple of possibilities in the 1 gallon and under range. Blue Can water sells water in 12 ounce (I think) soft drink size cans that is good for YEARS without doing any rotating, and the cans will fit in lots of small storage places in your house and car. But cost is a factor. I’ve also had good luck with Puravai water, which sells water in 1 liter bottles and is also good for YEARS of shelf life. But again, cost is a factor. But if you factor in that these two sources come in their own containers, there is no need to buy your own containers, no need to buy bleach, etc. to clean containers regularly, and no need to carry around lots of water weight to maintain rotation, these two might be a good option for you. And there are folks on this forum with WAY MORE experience in these matters than I have. These are just the two sources I use. There are LOTS of options for water, containers, filters, reverse osmosis, etc. on the market. For our household, I use the two sources mentioned above for long term storage drinking water storage, and use rotated (reverse osmosis) water for cooking, cleaning, hand washing, etc. Our “rotated” water supplies are in 10 liter and 20 liter Scepter water jugs, also shown elsewhere on this site. But a 20 liter jug full of water is roughly 45 pounds. Let me encourage you also to consider the structural capabilities of your water storage area in making your plans for water storage. There are 55 gallon drums out there made specifically for water storage, which can be both filled and drained by hand pumps a bit at a time so you have no water lifting to do as you use the water. But if I remember correctly, water is 7 to 8 pounds per gallon. Not all homes have floors that are built to take 400 pounds dropped on them in a couple of square feet of floor space. Good Hunting!

Good Evening jgrif, Wanted to chime in on keeping drinkable water in the Scepter water jugs. The information already posted by Redneck and Olly Wright tracks exactly with what I’ve found to work with the Scepter jugs. Light and air are indeed the enemy when it comes to storage. I rotate both 10 liter and 20 liter Scepter jugs, and use Dawn as noted in the other posts here. As an added thought, your wife’s desire for some form of filtration might be something that can work to both her advantage and yours.  Because of really hard water where I live, we put in a fancy, (seven stage) reverse osmosis water unit at our home. The Scepter jugs stay in our garage, and get filled (via a Naglene pitcher) with water from the R.O. unit. Said R.O. units are expensive, but against what you may be paying for filters, (or filtered / bottled water), the R.O. unit may pay itself off over time, particularly if you do the yearly maintenance on the R.O. unit yourself. And R.O. water brings the risk of bad stuff growing in your stored water WAY down. I store R.O. water for 5 months in sealed Scepter jugs and have had no contamination issues in the five years I’ve been rotating. And the last 5 month old sample I had a lab check came back WAY cleaner than the stuff that comes out of our taps. And for you, the only time you have to lift that 20 liter (5 gallon) jug is to dump the old water and clean the jug. I dump that water on our yard trees because of our high desert environment. But it’s very drinkable at that point. I suspect also that your wife will be happier if you can do this as R.O. water tastes really good (at least to us). Let me encourage you also to consider buying at least one 10 liter (2-1/2 gallon) Scepter jug to use in “emergency” times when you are actually living off your stored water. A full five gallon jug is in the neighborhood of 40 to 45 pounds. That can be difficult to control and pour accurately, particularly if you are in the post 50th birthday crowd. Pouring half the contents of Scepter’s 20 liter jog into a 10 liter jug and then using that 10 liter jug to fill water bottles / glasses / pet water bowls, etc. without spilling any water is BUNCHES easier, at least for me. And keep in mind please that some states limit how many gallons of liquid you can move in your vehicle before you need a special class of drivers license to carry said liquid in your vehicle. A county sheriff friend of mine recently said he had issued a verbal warning to guy he pulled over because the guy had 150 gallons of (unsecured) water in containers in the back of his SUV. In a freeway speed crash, it would only take one of these full jugs to the back of your head to kill. The good news is there are racks manufactured specifically to secure the Scepter jugs available from two or three sources. Thanks for reading my two cents worth!

Good Evening Greg, Congratulations on your Ham ticket. I just did my first 10 year renewal of my ham ticket, and like Seasons4, I still have MUCH to learn! Some thoughts that might help. Keep checking on linked repeater nets. I’d also check the articles on this site about GMRS radio service. It may be a long shot in your area. but some places will have enough low power GMRS repeaters to possibly get through your mountains. If you do go that route, you’ll need a separate GMRS license (with a different call sign), but I don’t think there is any test to take. If your budget can handle such things, satellite phones are available for a flat yearly fee for the phone, and a flat fee per minute for talk time. And sat. service is TOTALLY independent of cell towers, yeah! There are also satellite based services that move text message traffic only that are cheaper than voice service. If you and your family go that route, make sure you can live with satellite phone quirks. Sat. units work MUCH better outdoors, and some sat. networks use satellites that orbit just a few degrees above your ground level horizon, and the service is “line of sight”. So mountains can again be an issue if you are too close to them. And satellite based service can get really jammed really quickly if cell networks have an outage of more than 1 or 2 towers. In my area anyway, cell network failures are mercifully rare. Also, ALL sat. phone traffic is recorded for national security reasons. (Privacy issues?) One of the joys of ham radio is that its capabilities are growing quickly as technology progresses. And like all electronics, the cost of a unit with a given set of capabilities gets lower over time. Happy hunting!


Load more...