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Good question that merits more attention as people play toy soldier and storm places of worship, federal and national buildings, etc. – armed and dangerous. Wikipedia reflects crowd-sourced data that is not checked by experts or academics, although a small handful of editors have either of those backgrounds, so Wiki is not a strong source of information. It’s an ok starting point. Check Academia.edu for open source articles and Google Scholar for more on the issue if that’s your thing.  I’m trained as an academic and have survived “civil unrest” under communist regimes that our family fled and civil unrest in Los Angeles. Civil unrest is not necessarily tied to protests, peaceful or otherwise, but to the growing collapse of perceived democracy and civil rights. Without getting into a political discussion about the various perceptions of unrest, typically civil unrest occurs as a response to failing democratic institutions. For example, the IRA rose in North Ireland only after the Catholics, the majority of whom were centrist, welcomed the British thinking they would come rescue the Catholics from the Protestants, who were opening fire on Catholics. Instead, the British beat up the Catholics, which radicalized them and forced the center to move to one extreme, so the Catholics supported the IRA, even though they didn’t like it. In the 1960s to the 1980s, the “years of lead” in Italy saw rising violence and bombings in response to rising far-right politics that took hold in Italy as a back lash to 25 years of unresolved political scars after 20 years of fascism. “Unrest” looked like car bombings, street on street random violence, pulling people out of their homes, not like window smashing and chaos agents after protests. Similarly, in the U.S. during the 1890s, some white nationalists felt displaced by rising black wealth, so they dragged black people out of their homes, as well as their allies, and “took over” the town and people’s homes. America has a particular history of civil unrest that is not usually taught in school – and very dangerous.  Barbara F. Walters, an academic from UCSD, who wrote “How Civil Wars Start,” outlines the the various factors that lead to “civil unrest” which is related to civil war. Civil war is harder to define as a term. But, at least in North America, civil unrest could look like people bombing a school board meeting, dragging people out of their houses based on their voter’s registration (something far-right groups like the Oath Keepers and Patriots have proposed on the internet), storming state houses, book bans, unqualified parents checking teacher’s teaching plans (Florida), etc. Things like collapsing bodily autonomy can lead to wider unrest. When women couldn’t secure bread for their families during the late 1700s in France, women stormed the Bastille – largely considered the trigger shot that began the complex mechanisms leading to the French Revolution. As previously reasonable people grow more afraid, they may grow more extreme in their response by adopting extremists views.  Another academic whose work you might find interesting on this topic is Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an expert in fascism and authoritarianism.  While both academics offer more leftists solutions to issues inherent within questions of civil unrest and war, both outline what leads to unrest and what to look for. I can tell you I see a lot of the same mistakes being made all over again at both the federal and state levels in the U.S. Canada isn’t far behind, and there is a possibility that as climate change gets worse, the U.S. could invade our northern neighbor on false grounds as a way to steal resources.  I say all this and prepping for civil unrest is not a major prep for our family beyond measures that make sense anywhere: basic home security, fence, beam lights, bags in multiple locations, etc. If it’s coming, you’ll see it coming a few days or hours in advance. When we lived in Los Angeles, I remember riots shutting down the main street near our home a block away, but never entering residential areas like everyone assumed. We bugged in and were fine. A bunch of chaos agents descending into the city from surrounding areas breaking and stealing from stores. It will look differently in more rural areas, although civil unrest in a lot of histories are preceded by purity tests, political extremism, and unchecked branches of gov’t growing too powerful and overwhelming centrists’ ability or willingness to address them in realtime. Expect more unrest as climate change, which is beyond debate here, will overwhelm society’s ability to adapt. 

Hi Tim, I want to preface all of this by saying that I am not a financial advisor (not worth hiring) or a fiduciary (worth hiring). If you look into the FIRE community, which is a type of financial planning movement (like Money Moustache), you’ll find a lot of information there on both passive income streams and investing. Remember that no one has all the answers, not even the Fed or the World Bank. That said, you can get passive income from investments, products you sell, etc.  You’re never too young to invest. College students can do so with even just $20-50 a month. Vanguard makes it nice and easy to do so. Don’t expect huge returns, nothing is a quick fix. At your age, invest and don’t touch except to recalibrate your investments as necessary. For instance, don’t put everything in stocks or crypto. Putting all of your eggs in one basket makes it more likely that you could lose everything. Diversifying is best: bonds, previous metals, etc.  This particular market cycle is unlike any other in recorded global history. Currently, i-bonds are performing better at about a 9% return (limited at 10k) and hard assets (real estate, metals, energy, food companies, grain, water, etc.). Besides real estate, there’s also jewelry (diamonds, etc.), art, collectibles, etc. that you can invest in and can be considered hard assets. That said, actual food is great to buy and store provided you have the room and won’t be mobile anytime soon. For example, I starting upping our storage of grain, pasta and bread (in the freezer) since things have risen 30%+. I freeze bottles of OJ because my family consumes it on occasion and it’s almost $8 with citrus collapsing.  In college, creating passive income is a major challenge – unless you can create a small side business that you run and which requires you hire people. I had a cleaning side hustle in college with some girlfriends, and I received a 10% cut of every place they cleaned since I provided the client and vacuum cleaner. I always had girls work in pairs because it can be scary being young, female and entering people’s homes alone without knowing who you’ll find there.  Investing and entrepreneurship will help support passive income streams, but I recommend researching here deeply before putting your eggs anywhere. At your age, passive income streams are more limited until you gain some skills or larger piles of cash to invest.  Hope this helps some. 

I’ve been thinking about this even more now that I have a child to raise. I used to be a professor and we discussed this often, too.  Invest in skills over things. You would be surprised to find how mobile humanity has been during the course of our entire existence until a few hundred years ago. Mobility will be key in the migratory future we all face.  Best thing is to learn how to do a job/career remotely. If you can take your job with you where ever you may need to flee, then you have an uninterrupted income stream (provided you don’t lose your job). Find a field you can work in remotely. Points for entrepreneurship that requires online sales (items held off site at a 3rd location) for passive income. And any other forms of passive income (returns on investments). Let me know if you need more brainstorming on this subject – I work remotely now after leaving academia. Also, keep up job skills that you can trade in lieu of a remote position or complementing one. For instance, being a contractor, plumber, fix solar panels, etc. So, if the internet goes down temporarily or permanently, you can still “make a living.”  One thing is for certain: the global GDP with contract dramatically and permanently. Money can become devalued over night (Germany WWI, Venezuela, Lebanon, etc.) or you may be forced to flee and leave everything behind – whether you want to or not. Better inflation bet for the future: invest in real estate in potential climate havens rather than the coasts, SE or the Midwest. Who cares how much gold you have if you can’t access it where it’s held because the vault is closed permanently? 

This is something we’ve been considering for many years now. From extensive research, here are some top things individuals can do: 1. Eat less meat. When you do, make sure it comes from a regenerative farm, which enriches soil against climate change impacts. No one is trying to replace your burger, but make better choices. No big farm meat, like Tyson or Perdue. It’s also filled with PFASs and other chemicals. 2. Eat more vegetables. It also supports your health. 3. Farm/grow food regeneratively. 4. Become a producer, not a consumer. Produce whatever you can. Reuse what you can’t. 5. Don’t have a large brood of kids, adopt if that’s your dream. Besides their carbon footprint, who wants to watch their kids die? Kids rarely follow in their parents’ line of thinking, no matter your beliefs, so they are more at risk of getting separated and being unprepared. 6. Go off-grid. Besides the added benefit of increasing your family’s resiliency, doing so uses far less energy and footprint than other approaches. 7. Go electric. Gas blowers and gas equipment may perform better now, but expect 1) skyrocketing fuel prices, 2) massive pollution. Did you know gas blowers pollute as much as several dozen cars idling? Also, if you want, drive an electric vehicle, but know that your food sources are the single most effective thing you can do to impact climate change mitigation. 8. Make your house as sustainable as possible using green materials. Retrofit rather than build new. Construction is exploding climate change impacts. 9.. Practice mental resiliency. The world is going to fall apart in ways we can only imagine. You’re going to need to find the will within yourself to keep living not only for those who depend on you, but also for the future of humanity.*** This won’t reduce your climate change impact, but it will help over all.  10. LOBBY YOUR POLITICIANS and major companies!

I hear you about low-tech! The option you posted was very interesting, great for large items if you have some power.  How long you agitate depends on 1) how large the item is, 2) how dirty, 3) if it’s been spot treated. I spot treat everything (except silk or wool) with Charlie’s Soap stain treatment (Dr. Bonner’s has excellent guidance on using Sal Suds or Dr. Bronner’s castile soap for this, also) if the stain is bad enough.  When hand-washing, I frequently check the item to see if the stain is lift, but pre-treating the fabric is key to getting even heavy stains out.  I typically do this work in the bath tub (less to lift). If you’re preserving water, a bucket works great, too. Or even a deep (disinfected) kitchen sink. If laundering sheets and other items that become very heavy with water, I recommend washing in a large basin outside rather than a bucket. You’ll encounter a lot of dripping when transferring the item to the clothes line through the house. You then want to leave the garment or textile enough room to get deeply wet and then create friction in the water. There are special soaps (usually British or German, some Italian) that you can use for hand-washing. I just use Molly’s Suds. A powder works better rather than a liquid soap because most liquid soaps weigh the fabric down and don’t rinse out as easily. I recommend a buddy if you need to wring out sheets or blankets unless you’ve got wicked upper body strength.  Hanging wash on a laundry line helps to disinfect fabric. The sun burns off many kinds of bacteria and viruses. Solar power has lots of positives 🙂 


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Good question that merits more attention as people play toy soldier and storm places of worship, federal and national buildings, etc. – armed and dangerous. Wikipedia reflects crowd-sourced data that is not checked by experts or academics, although a small handful of editors have either of those backgrounds, so Wiki is not a strong source of information. It’s an ok starting point. Check Academia.edu for open source articles and Google Scholar for more on the issue if that’s your thing.  I’m trained as an academic and have survived “civil unrest” under communist regimes that our family fled and civil unrest in Los Angeles. Civil unrest is not necessarily tied to protests, peaceful or otherwise, but to the growing collapse of perceived democracy and civil rights. Without getting into a political discussion about the various perceptions of unrest, typically civil unrest occurs as a response to failing democratic institutions. For example, the IRA rose in North Ireland only after the Catholics, the majority of whom were centrist, welcomed the British thinking they would come rescue the Catholics from the Protestants, who were opening fire on Catholics. Instead, the British beat up the Catholics, which radicalized them and forced the center to move to one extreme, so the Catholics supported the IRA, even though they didn’t like it. In the 1960s to the 1980s, the “years of lead” in Italy saw rising violence and bombings in response to rising far-right politics that took hold in Italy as a back lash to 25 years of unresolved political scars after 20 years of fascism. “Unrest” looked like car bombings, street on street random violence, pulling people out of their homes, not like window smashing and chaos agents after protests. Similarly, in the U.S. during the 1890s, some white nationalists felt displaced by rising black wealth, so they dragged black people out of their homes, as well as their allies, and “took over” the town and people’s homes. America has a particular history of civil unrest that is not usually taught in school – and very dangerous.  Barbara F. Walters, an academic from UCSD, who wrote “How Civil Wars Start,” outlines the the various factors that lead to “civil unrest” which is related to civil war. Civil war is harder to define as a term. But, at least in North America, civil unrest could look like people bombing a school board meeting, dragging people out of their houses based on their voter’s registration (something far-right groups like the Oath Keepers and Patriots have proposed on the internet), storming state houses, book bans, unqualified parents checking teacher’s teaching plans (Florida), etc. Things like collapsing bodily autonomy can lead to wider unrest. When women couldn’t secure bread for their families during the late 1700s in France, women stormed the Bastille – largely considered the trigger shot that began the complex mechanisms leading to the French Revolution. As previously reasonable people grow more afraid, they may grow more extreme in their response by adopting extremists views.  Another academic whose work you might find interesting on this topic is Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an expert in fascism and authoritarianism.  While both academics offer more leftists solutions to issues inherent within questions of civil unrest and war, both outline what leads to unrest and what to look for. I can tell you I see a lot of the same mistakes being made all over again at both the federal and state levels in the U.S. Canada isn’t far behind, and there is a possibility that as climate change gets worse, the U.S. could invade our northern neighbor on false grounds as a way to steal resources.  I say all this and prepping for civil unrest is not a major prep for our family beyond measures that make sense anywhere: basic home security, fence, beam lights, bags in multiple locations, etc. If it’s coming, you’ll see it coming a few days or hours in advance. When we lived in Los Angeles, I remember riots shutting down the main street near our home a block away, but never entering residential areas like everyone assumed. We bugged in and were fine. A bunch of chaos agents descending into the city from surrounding areas breaking and stealing from stores. It will look differently in more rural areas, although civil unrest in a lot of histories are preceded by purity tests, political extremism, and unchecked branches of gov’t growing too powerful and overwhelming centrists’ ability or willingness to address them in realtime. Expect more unrest as climate change, which is beyond debate here, will overwhelm society’s ability to adapt. 

Hi Tim, I want to preface all of this by saying that I am not a financial advisor (not worth hiring) or a fiduciary (worth hiring). If you look into the FIRE community, which is a type of financial planning movement (like Money Moustache), you’ll find a lot of information there on both passive income streams and investing. Remember that no one has all the answers, not even the Fed or the World Bank. That said, you can get passive income from investments, products you sell, etc.  You’re never too young to invest. College students can do so with even just $20-50 a month. Vanguard makes it nice and easy to do so. Don’t expect huge returns, nothing is a quick fix. At your age, invest and don’t touch except to recalibrate your investments as necessary. For instance, don’t put everything in stocks or crypto. Putting all of your eggs in one basket makes it more likely that you could lose everything. Diversifying is best: bonds, previous metals, etc.  This particular market cycle is unlike any other in recorded global history. Currently, i-bonds are performing better at about a 9% return (limited at 10k) and hard assets (real estate, metals, energy, food companies, grain, water, etc.). Besides real estate, there’s also jewelry (diamonds, etc.), art, collectibles, etc. that you can invest in and can be considered hard assets. That said, actual food is great to buy and store provided you have the room and won’t be mobile anytime soon. For example, I starting upping our storage of grain, pasta and bread (in the freezer) since things have risen 30%+. I freeze bottles of OJ because my family consumes it on occasion and it’s almost $8 with citrus collapsing.  In college, creating passive income is a major challenge – unless you can create a small side business that you run and which requires you hire people. I had a cleaning side hustle in college with some girlfriends, and I received a 10% cut of every place they cleaned since I provided the client and vacuum cleaner. I always had girls work in pairs because it can be scary being young, female and entering people’s homes alone without knowing who you’ll find there.  Investing and entrepreneurship will help support passive income streams, but I recommend researching here deeply before putting your eggs anywhere. At your age, passive income streams are more limited until you gain some skills or larger piles of cash to invest.  Hope this helps some. 

I’ve been thinking about this even more now that I have a child to raise. I used to be a professor and we discussed this often, too.  Invest in skills over things. You would be surprised to find how mobile humanity has been during the course of our entire existence until a few hundred years ago. Mobility will be key in the migratory future we all face.  Best thing is to learn how to do a job/career remotely. If you can take your job with you where ever you may need to flee, then you have an uninterrupted income stream (provided you don’t lose your job). Find a field you can work in remotely. Points for entrepreneurship that requires online sales (items held off site at a 3rd location) for passive income. And any other forms of passive income (returns on investments). Let me know if you need more brainstorming on this subject – I work remotely now after leaving academia. Also, keep up job skills that you can trade in lieu of a remote position or complementing one. For instance, being a contractor, plumber, fix solar panels, etc. So, if the internet goes down temporarily or permanently, you can still “make a living.”  One thing is for certain: the global GDP with contract dramatically and permanently. Money can become devalued over night (Germany WWI, Venezuela, Lebanon, etc.) or you may be forced to flee and leave everything behind – whether you want to or not. Better inflation bet for the future: invest in real estate in potential climate havens rather than the coasts, SE or the Midwest. Who cares how much gold you have if you can’t access it where it’s held because the vault is closed permanently? 

This is something we’ve been considering for many years now. From extensive research, here are some top things individuals can do: 1. Eat less meat. When you do, make sure it comes from a regenerative farm, which enriches soil against climate change impacts. No one is trying to replace your burger, but make better choices. No big farm meat, like Tyson or Perdue. It’s also filled with PFASs and other chemicals. 2. Eat more vegetables. It also supports your health. 3. Farm/grow food regeneratively. 4. Become a producer, not a consumer. Produce whatever you can. Reuse what you can’t. 5. Don’t have a large brood of kids, adopt if that’s your dream. Besides their carbon footprint, who wants to watch their kids die? Kids rarely follow in their parents’ line of thinking, no matter your beliefs, so they are more at risk of getting separated and being unprepared. 6. Go off-grid. Besides the added benefit of increasing your family’s resiliency, doing so uses far less energy and footprint than other approaches. 7. Go electric. Gas blowers and gas equipment may perform better now, but expect 1) skyrocketing fuel prices, 2) massive pollution. Did you know gas blowers pollute as much as several dozen cars idling? Also, if you want, drive an electric vehicle, but know that your food sources are the single most effective thing you can do to impact climate change mitigation. 8. Make your house as sustainable as possible using green materials. Retrofit rather than build new. Construction is exploding climate change impacts. 9.. Practice mental resiliency. The world is going to fall apart in ways we can only imagine. You’re going to need to find the will within yourself to keep living not only for those who depend on you, but also for the future of humanity.*** This won’t reduce your climate change impact, but it will help over all.  10. LOBBY YOUR POLITICIANS and major companies!

I hear you about low-tech! The option you posted was very interesting, great for large items if you have some power.  How long you agitate depends on 1) how large the item is, 2) how dirty, 3) if it’s been spot treated. I spot treat everything (except silk or wool) with Charlie’s Soap stain treatment (Dr. Bonner’s has excellent guidance on using Sal Suds or Dr. Bronner’s castile soap for this, also) if the stain is bad enough.  When hand-washing, I frequently check the item to see if the stain is lift, but pre-treating the fabric is key to getting even heavy stains out.  I typically do this work in the bath tub (less to lift). If you’re preserving water, a bucket works great, too. Or even a deep (disinfected) kitchen sink. If laundering sheets and other items that become very heavy with water, I recommend washing in a large basin outside rather than a bucket. You’ll encounter a lot of dripping when transferring the item to the clothes line through the house. You then want to leave the garment or textile enough room to get deeply wet and then create friction in the water. There are special soaps (usually British or German, some Italian) that you can use for hand-washing. I just use Molly’s Suds. A powder works better rather than a liquid soap because most liquid soaps weigh the fabric down and don’t rinse out as easily. I recommend a buddy if you need to wring out sheets or blankets unless you’ve got wicked upper body strength.  Hanging wash on a laundry line helps to disinfect fabric. The sun burns off many kinds of bacteria and viruses. Solar power has lots of positives 🙂 


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