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Bare bones: 1.  FREE Most important – review your insurance policies (homeowner/renter/landlord) annually. 2.  FREE  Pre-arrange with each person in your dwelling to have the same primary out-of-state contact in case of emergency who can receive calls and post updates on social media.  Put it in each person’s  cel phone under EMERGENCY  3.  FREE Pre-arrange a primary AND secondary place to meet if it becomes chaotic during an emergency.  (Cell phones often don’t work during emergencies because of damage to the towers or because the system around the disaster zone is overloaded–see #2 above).   Put in the notes section of the cel phone EMERGENCY contact. 4.  FREE Pre-arrange and provide written permission to have others pick up any children in the dwelling in case you cannot get them yourself.   Explain this to the child(ren).  Put the names/phone numbers/addresses of these person(s) in the notes section of each person’s cel phone EMERGENCY contact. 5.  $5-$20 Buy used piece of rolling luggage at a thrift store.   Size:  same as what would fit under a seat in an airplane or under a bed or on a closet shelf. ($5 -$20 per piece of luggage).   Each adult in the dwelling should have an individual piece of rolling luggage OR a two adults can combine their luggage.   Each child should have a small, used backpack or rolling book bag (like used in elementary/middle school).     These bags should be dedicated to emergency use only!   Never “borrow” things from these bags intending to put them back later!   These are designed to be  bags that you pack and store under bed or in closet where you can forget about them unless needed.   For example, a family with 2 adults and 2 children aged 7 and 9 may need 1 piece of luggage for adults, two small, used backpack or rolling book bag for each child.   These will be your emergency “grab and run for safety” (i.e., fire drill) bags that you will fill. 6.   FREE Go to each person’s closet and pick out a complete change of clothing, including a coat, socks, old-broken-in comfortable shoes/underwear/rain gear etc.    Usually this is free because you can pick the ugly stuff you purchased and never wear.  For children, put in clothing/shoes/etc. that are 1-3 sizes larger than needed in case you forget to update their bag and their stuff is too small when needed.  (Hand-me-downs from stair-step-kids are great.) FREE Have each child choose a comfort item (stuffed animal, game, blanket) to put in their “Fire Drill” bag.   7.  $10-$40+ PETS – Buy a carrier at a thrift store for dog/cat.  Go to Dollar Store and purchase a can of pop-top wet pet food, small bag of kibble (or make up small pest-proof packages from your existing pet food), leash, water bowl, food bowl, baby blanket, 2 liter bottle of water. Put all these supplies in the carrier in a bag and stuff in the carrier.   Write your name/address/phone/pet’s name in Sharpie on the outside of the carrier.  When ready to run, put in pet, tie supplies to top of crate and go.   (Pets go missing during evacuations and in shelters!) NOTE:  Large animals require a much different evacuation plan which will NOT be covered here.  Make your plans ahead of time!  If you have horses/livestock, etc., make SURE they are trained to load in horse trailers!  If you can’t load livestock, let them loose after you spray paint your phone number on the hide of each animal.   8.  $5-10 In adult bags:  Paper maps of the geographic region!   Do NOT rely on cel phone GPS! 9.  $10-20 In adult bags:  New, unused iphone AND android cables AND chargers.  (They don’t need to be high quality, cheap ones will do just fine.)  These are NEVER to be “borrowed” or taken out of the Emergency Go Bag!     10.  $5 per person’s bag:  From Dollar Store three cans of easily opened, ready to eat, things like Spaghettios, a bottle of water, roll of toilet paper.    11.  FREE – if anyone needs prescription or reading glasses – put in an old pair that you don’t use anymore.   12.  FREE (you already have them)  Prescription medications: if not able to place in dedicated “fire drill” evacuation bag, make sure you know where the medications are so they can be grabbed quickly and stuffed in the bag. 13.   $5-$15 N-95 particulate respirator masks (3 each)  MUST BE N-95 MASKS!  Do not substitute any other type of face mask! For each adult bag:  $30 up depending on your thrift store finds. For each child backpack or rolling book bag:  $15 up  For small/medium dogs/cats:  $20-40 up depending on price of used crates

@A2 – I would like readers of this thread to read this article from The Press Democrat, 2016, about the difficulties of re-building a year after the wildfire.  Here is the hyperlink:  A year later, Valley fire’s massive toll in Lake County means long, difficult recovery ahead In the original post for this forum thread, I posted two hyperlinks to  articles I wrote that were published  in 2018 in the East County Magazine:  “Peace of Mind” 3-10 Minute Evacuation Plan for Wildfires, Part 1, and “Peace of Mind” 3-10 Minute Evacuation Plan for Wildfires, Part 2.   The one year follow-up article hyperlink above nicely summarizes the long, difficult recovery after wildfires.    Packing a go-bag is fun, being prepared by knowing how to start fires and boil water with flint and magnesium is fun, learning how to apply a tourniquet is fun.   Learning about and thinking about and planning to be prepared is fun.  Insurance is NOT fun.  Giving up Starbucks, movies, cable,  eating out, buying cheaper cigarettes/wine/beer/soda; none of these things are “fun”.   To be truly and honestly prepared to have “Peace of Mind” if you must evacuate during a wildfire isn’t just about having preparedness supplies and the mindset to leave, it’s also about doing the paperwork BEFORE a wildfire.  It’s about trimming your budget, being financially responsible, and waiting to buy guns/bullets/band aids if you cannot afford insurance (renter’s insurance, homeowner insurance, landlord insurance, car insurance, health insurance).    I’m totally envious of A2’s pre-packed tear-drop trailer and Bob’s plan to evacuate by boat is needed.  I would love to have a tear-drop trailer and boat that I could pre-pack, park, and be ready to drive away.    Can’t afford it.  It has taken me and my niece 8 years to build up our emergency supplies after the double whammy of the 2003 Cedars Wildfire recovery and rebuild, and then the sudden, catastrophic illness and death of my sister.  These events nearly took everything we had to just stay afloat; there was nothing left to buy Mountain House food or fancy lanterns.    In the time between these financial hits, we just hunkered down, did without, and eventually reached a point where savings and purchases of Mountain House food and other supplies became possible.   @A2 said above, “And that is why I prep”.  (High five, A2, been there, done that.) I say, “That is why I prep and have become an insurance fanatic.”    I am fully aware that we may need to flee a future wildfire and have all of our preparedness supplies destroyed if our homes burn.  I’m ok with that, because I have insurance.

On behalf of myself and the others who have responded, glad this topic has been helpful.    I rarely participate in online forums about prepping.  I read about prepping a lot.  I have so much to share about safe/sane wildfire evacuation–it’s my personal “soapbox”.   Some will listen, most will not.   Here is an abbreviated version of my evacuation list printed on paper and taped to inside bath cabinet: IN PRIORITY ORDER:   (This should only take 3-5 minutes) Lock dog in hall bathroom until can place in emergency carrier. (this hyperlink will give exact instructions on my pre-staged dog carrier)  “PEACE OF MIND” 3-10 MINUTE EVACUATION PLAN FOR WILDFIRES PART Contact Sam/Sal/Kids by phone AND text Get dogs Emergency Carrier from Shed, place on front seat of car Unlock and position car pointed out toward exit–Press Panic button on fob to warn neighbors that something is up Put dog in Carrier and place in front seat of car Purse, Cel phone, Charger All keys in my plastic box in cupboard by tv Daily Medicine containers (on top of microwave in kitchen) Emergency medical information on side of fridge N95 masks, PPE, and Over-the-Counter meds stored in guest room STORED IN MY MASTER BEDROOM: Blue documents case BiPap Air Curve 10 by bed (take all connected cords and VERY IMPORTANT DC adapter cable above shoe storage near the deep cell batteries in the guest room Laptop and charging cable Plastic box of photos on closet shelf AND Grandma’s old family papers in box WHAT TO PACK NEXT ONLY IF TIME PERMITS:   (Shouldn’t take more than 10 more minutes) Extra dog food Water and Mountain House food under Guest Bed Emergency supplies stored under Guest Bed Sister’s oil painting in hallway (wrap in blankets/dirty launder in hamper) Wood Statue in front room (wrap in blankets/clothes) Clothes, Shoes, Socks, Underwear, Bra, Coat (place in large trash bag) Blankets, pillows Curio cabinet items (wraps in blankets, clothes) NOW DRIVE TO FAMILY’S HOME!   (see attached Evacuation lists for their home) The rest of the page has Emergency OUT OF STATE Contact Numbers/Names. Emergency health information on each family member, including their health insurance plan name and ID number and phone/address.    Include any allergies and blood type of each family member


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Bare bones: 1.  FREE Most important – review your insurance policies (homeowner/renter/landlord) annually. 2.  FREE  Pre-arrange with each person in your dwelling to have the same primary out-of-state contact in case of emergency who can receive calls and post updates on social media.  Put it in each person’s  cel phone under EMERGENCY  3.  FREE Pre-arrange a primary AND secondary place to meet if it becomes chaotic during an emergency.  (Cell phones often don’t work during emergencies because of damage to the towers or because the system around the disaster zone is overloaded–see #2 above).   Put in the notes section of the cel phone EMERGENCY contact. 4.  FREE Pre-arrange and provide written permission to have others pick up any children in the dwelling in case you cannot get them yourself.   Explain this to the child(ren).  Put the names/phone numbers/addresses of these person(s) in the notes section of each person’s cel phone EMERGENCY contact. 5.  $5-$20 Buy used piece of rolling luggage at a thrift store.   Size:  same as what would fit under a seat in an airplane or under a bed or on a closet shelf. ($5 -$20 per piece of luggage).   Each adult in the dwelling should have an individual piece of rolling luggage OR a two adults can combine their luggage.   Each child should have a small, used backpack or rolling book bag (like used in elementary/middle school).     These bags should be dedicated to emergency use only!   Never “borrow” things from these bags intending to put them back later!   These are designed to be  bags that you pack and store under bed or in closet where you can forget about them unless needed.   For example, a family with 2 adults and 2 children aged 7 and 9 may need 1 piece of luggage for adults, two small, used backpack or rolling book bag for each child.   These will be your emergency “grab and run for safety” (i.e., fire drill) bags that you will fill. 6.   FREE Go to each person’s closet and pick out a complete change of clothing, including a coat, socks, old-broken-in comfortable shoes/underwear/rain gear etc.    Usually this is free because you can pick the ugly stuff you purchased and never wear.  For children, put in clothing/shoes/etc. that are 1-3 sizes larger than needed in case you forget to update their bag and their stuff is too small when needed.  (Hand-me-downs from stair-step-kids are great.) FREE Have each child choose a comfort item (stuffed animal, game, blanket) to put in their “Fire Drill” bag.   7.  $10-$40+ PETS – Buy a carrier at a thrift store for dog/cat.  Go to Dollar Store and purchase a can of pop-top wet pet food, small bag of kibble (or make up small pest-proof packages from your existing pet food), leash, water bowl, food bowl, baby blanket, 2 liter bottle of water. Put all these supplies in the carrier in a bag and stuff in the carrier.   Write your name/address/phone/pet’s name in Sharpie on the outside of the carrier.  When ready to run, put in pet, tie supplies to top of crate and go.   (Pets go missing during evacuations and in shelters!) NOTE:  Large animals require a much different evacuation plan which will NOT be covered here.  Make your plans ahead of time!  If you have horses/livestock, etc., make SURE they are trained to load in horse trailers!  If you can’t load livestock, let them loose after you spray paint your phone number on the hide of each animal.   8.  $5-10 In adult bags:  Paper maps of the geographic region!   Do NOT rely on cel phone GPS! 9.  $10-20 In adult bags:  New, unused iphone AND android cables AND chargers.  (They don’t need to be high quality, cheap ones will do just fine.)  These are NEVER to be “borrowed” or taken out of the Emergency Go Bag!     10.  $5 per person’s bag:  From Dollar Store three cans of easily opened, ready to eat, things like Spaghettios, a bottle of water, roll of toilet paper.    11.  FREE – if anyone needs prescription or reading glasses – put in an old pair that you don’t use anymore.   12.  FREE (you already have them)  Prescription medications: if not able to place in dedicated “fire drill” evacuation bag, make sure you know where the medications are so they can be grabbed quickly and stuffed in the bag. 13.   $5-$15 N-95 particulate respirator masks (3 each)  MUST BE N-95 MASKS!  Do not substitute any other type of face mask! For each adult bag:  $30 up depending on your thrift store finds. For each child backpack or rolling book bag:  $15 up  For small/medium dogs/cats:  $20-40 up depending on price of used crates

@A2 – I would like readers of this thread to read this article from The Press Democrat, 2016, about the difficulties of re-building a year after the wildfire.  Here is the hyperlink:  A year later, Valley fire’s massive toll in Lake County means long, difficult recovery ahead In the original post for this forum thread, I posted two hyperlinks to  articles I wrote that were published  in 2018 in the East County Magazine:  “Peace of Mind” 3-10 Minute Evacuation Plan for Wildfires, Part 1, and “Peace of Mind” 3-10 Minute Evacuation Plan for Wildfires, Part 2.   The one year follow-up article hyperlink above nicely summarizes the long, difficult recovery after wildfires.    Packing a go-bag is fun, being prepared by knowing how to start fires and boil water with flint and magnesium is fun, learning how to apply a tourniquet is fun.   Learning about and thinking about and planning to be prepared is fun.  Insurance is NOT fun.  Giving up Starbucks, movies, cable,  eating out, buying cheaper cigarettes/wine/beer/soda; none of these things are “fun”.   To be truly and honestly prepared to have “Peace of Mind” if you must evacuate during a wildfire isn’t just about having preparedness supplies and the mindset to leave, it’s also about doing the paperwork BEFORE a wildfire.  It’s about trimming your budget, being financially responsible, and waiting to buy guns/bullets/band aids if you cannot afford insurance (renter’s insurance, homeowner insurance, landlord insurance, car insurance, health insurance).    I’m totally envious of A2’s pre-packed tear-drop trailer and Bob’s plan to evacuate by boat is needed.  I would love to have a tear-drop trailer and boat that I could pre-pack, park, and be ready to drive away.    Can’t afford it.  It has taken me and my niece 8 years to build up our emergency supplies after the double whammy of the 2003 Cedars Wildfire recovery and rebuild, and then the sudden, catastrophic illness and death of my sister.  These events nearly took everything we had to just stay afloat; there was nothing left to buy Mountain House food or fancy lanterns.    In the time between these financial hits, we just hunkered down, did without, and eventually reached a point where savings and purchases of Mountain House food and other supplies became possible.   @A2 said above, “And that is why I prep”.  (High five, A2, been there, done that.) I say, “That is why I prep and have become an insurance fanatic.”    I am fully aware that we may need to flee a future wildfire and have all of our preparedness supplies destroyed if our homes burn.  I’m ok with that, because I have insurance.

On behalf of myself and the others who have responded, glad this topic has been helpful.    I rarely participate in online forums about prepping.  I read about prepping a lot.  I have so much to share about safe/sane wildfire evacuation–it’s my personal “soapbox”.   Some will listen, most will not.   Here is an abbreviated version of my evacuation list printed on paper and taped to inside bath cabinet: IN PRIORITY ORDER:   (This should only take 3-5 minutes) Lock dog in hall bathroom until can place in emergency carrier. (this hyperlink will give exact instructions on my pre-staged dog carrier)  “PEACE OF MIND” 3-10 MINUTE EVACUATION PLAN FOR WILDFIRES PART Contact Sam/Sal/Kids by phone AND text Get dogs Emergency Carrier from Shed, place on front seat of car Unlock and position car pointed out toward exit–Press Panic button on fob to warn neighbors that something is up Put dog in Carrier and place in front seat of car Purse, Cel phone, Charger All keys in my plastic box in cupboard by tv Daily Medicine containers (on top of microwave in kitchen) Emergency medical information on side of fridge N95 masks, PPE, and Over-the-Counter meds stored in guest room STORED IN MY MASTER BEDROOM: Blue documents case BiPap Air Curve 10 by bed (take all connected cords and VERY IMPORTANT DC adapter cable above shoe storage near the deep cell batteries in the guest room Laptop and charging cable Plastic box of photos on closet shelf AND Grandma’s old family papers in box WHAT TO PACK NEXT ONLY IF TIME PERMITS:   (Shouldn’t take more than 10 more minutes) Extra dog food Water and Mountain House food under Guest Bed Emergency supplies stored under Guest Bed Sister’s oil painting in hallway (wrap in blankets/dirty launder in hamper) Wood Statue in front room (wrap in blankets/clothes) Clothes, Shoes, Socks, Underwear, Bra, Coat (place in large trash bag) Blankets, pillows Curio cabinet items (wraps in blankets, clothes) NOW DRIVE TO FAMILY’S HOME!   (see attached Evacuation lists for their home) The rest of the page has Emergency OUT OF STATE Contact Numbers/Names. Emergency health information on each family member, including their health insurance plan name and ID number and phone/address.    Include any allergies and blood type of each family member


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