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CNN airing documentary about The Prepared and this growing community

This Saturday, August 7th, CNN Films is premiering a half-hour documentary on the main CNN channel at 9pm ET / 6pm PT, with another airing at 9pm PT. It will be available for streaming on CNN's paid plan starting the following day. Myself, Jon Stokes, Tom Rader, Caleb Causey, and some of our family members sat down for a few days of interviews that (we're told) make up around half the film. CNN's crew visited while we were working on the new Austere First Aid video course, so they got some be

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New preview trailer + 50% off preorders for the Austere First Aid online video course

We've spent the last few months working on a course that we wish we had available when starting our preparedness journeys: Austere First Aid, or what to do in medical emergencies when you can't depend on professionals to save you. Some of the top austere/wilderness/tactical medical teachers in the country, including our own Tom Rader and guest instructors like Caleb Causey from Lone Star Medics, have condensed what would normally be a one-week, in-person Wilderness First Aid course into 7 hou

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Bug in vs. bug out: Why your home is always the default choice

Don't make this common and dangerous mistake. Survival experts explain why you always want to stay home unless forced to bug out.

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Review of the 2013 Korean film Flu, available for free on Amazon Prime as of this writing. Rating: 5/10 Summary: It won’t make the Best Of list, but it’s worth a watch if you want to see an Asian version of Contagion. The scene setting is the best part, while the interpersonal writing/storylines can be a real groaner. Plot: A mutated H5N1 avian flu rapidly breaks out in a suburb of Seoul. 50% of people get infected and 100% of those die. Everything breaks down in a day or two. It’s interesting seeing how different cultures think about disasters, how society or government will react, etc. I like the 2016 Japanese take on Godzilla, Shin Godzilla, for this reason — the story is told through the eyes of a mid-management government worker in Tokyo trying to handle the crisis response. Flu has a B-plot about the government response, but it’s more told through the eyes of a low-level Emergency Response Team member and the doctor he fancies.  One of the unique things in this movie is how much of the screen time is devoted to being in a quarantine camp. Plot lines include selfish people not wanting to follow directions, government lying, and all the normal stuff. The 5/10 rating mostly comes from the overall scene and storyline. While it’s on the better end of Korean cinema, you’ll still notice how it’s “not from Hollywood.” And some of the writing / devices used are groaners straight from the 90s.  One major highlight is the child actor, who plays the (maybe 7 year old?) daughter of the main doctor. She’s adorable and gives one of the better child performances I’ve seen in a while.

TP team on break the rest of June
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Review of the 2013 Korean film Flu, available for free on Amazon Prime as of this writing. Rating: 5/10 Summary: It won’t make the Best Of list, but it’s worth a watch if you want to see an Asian version of Contagion. The scene setting is the best part, while the interpersonal writing/storylines can be a real groaner. Plot: A mutated H5N1 avian flu rapidly breaks out in a suburb of Seoul. 50% of people get infected and 100% of those die. Everything breaks down in a day or two. It’s interesting seeing how different cultures think about disasters, how society or government will react, etc. I like the 2016 Japanese take on Godzilla, Shin Godzilla, for this reason — the story is told through the eyes of a mid-management government worker in Tokyo trying to handle the crisis response. Flu has a B-plot about the government response, but it’s more told through the eyes of a low-level Emergency Response Team member and the doctor he fancies.  One of the unique things in this movie is how much of the screen time is devoted to being in a quarantine camp. Plot lines include selfish people not wanting to follow directions, government lying, and all the normal stuff. The 5/10 rating mostly comes from the overall scene and storyline. While it’s on the better end of Korean cinema, you’ll still notice how it’s “not from Hollywood.” And some of the writing / devices used are groaners straight from the 90s.  One major highlight is the child actor, who plays the (maybe 7 year old?) daughter of the main doctor. She’s adorable and gives one of the better child performances I’ve seen in a while.


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